No Summer Basketball Under 14 Years Old? Here’s Why NBA, USA Basketball, and Olympic Committee Agree.

By Joe Haefner

No Summer Basketball Under 14 Years Old? Here’s Why NBA, USA Basketball, and Olympic Committee Agree.

This topic today could be extremely important to you, especially if you’re parent of a…

Video For Long Term Athletic Development Model – Take A Look So You Don’t Screw Up Your Kids or Athletes

By Joe Haefner

Video For Long Term Athletic Development Model – Take A Look So You Don’t Screw Up Your Kids or Athletes

This video is very important for parents, coaches, and players to understand long-term athletic development. The video was developed by…

Why Coaching from Stands Causes Confusion – And How to Stop Parents From Doing It

By Joe Haefner

Why Coaching from Stands Causes Confusion – And How to Stop Parents From Doing It

If you have parents that shout instructions to their kids from the stands, you probably already know that can be problematic. Nothing worse than a kid continually…

What Every Coach & Parent Can Learn From ESPN’s #1 College Player

By Joe Haefner

What Every Coach & Parent Can Learn From ESPN’s #1 College Player

If you watched college basketball last year, you’ll know that Frank Kaminsky led the Wisconsin Badgers to the Final Four and was named… 

How to Avoid the Superstar Syndrome

By Joe Haefner

How to Avoid the Superstar Syndrome

We have heard countless stories about young athletes in among the professional and college ranks that get into trouble because they violate the law. As coaches, fans and parent we wonder how this…

Parenting Advice: Helping Your Kids Succeed By Not Helping

By Joe Haefner

Daniel Coyle who is the author of the Talent Code referenced this post from this article called Please Don’t Help My Kids on one of his recent blog posts.  I highly advise you read the quote reference below and check out the articles.  They offer some great advice on parenting and how to avoid over-parenting.

Dear Other Parents At The Park:Please do not lift my daughters to the top of the ladder, especially after you’ve just heard me tell them I wasn’t going to do it for them and encourage them to try it themselves.

I am not sitting here, 15 whole feet away from my kids, because I am too lazy to get up. I am sitting here because I didn’t bring them to the park so they could learn how to manipulate others into doing the hard work for them. I brought them here so they could learn to do it themselves.

They’re not here to be at the top of the ladder; they are here to learn to climb. If they can’t do it on their own, they will survive the disappointment. What’s more, they will have a goal and the incentive to work to achieve it. It is not my job — and it is certainly not yours — to prevent my children from feeling frustration, fear, or discomfort. If I do, I have robbed them of the opportunity to learn that those things are not the end of the world, and can be overcome or used to their advantage.