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PostPosted: 04 Oct 2019, 10:10 

Posts: 6
I wanted to thank you for what you are doing. You have created a unique site with impressive information.

I need your advice. I am from Russia.

The fact is that coaching the 3rd year. I have young men from grades 1 to 11, divided into 3 groups (7-10 years old, 11-14, 15-18).
There are impressive players calling to the Moscow team, etc. But I just can't teach them how to interact as a team. I'm at a loss, I rummaged through a lot of information, took courses and can not teach them how to play basketball as a team.

They have a good dribbling, pass, some throw well, but only individually.

I used the resource basketball for coaching, but the work is motion offense, it turns out to be very chaotic movements and basketball. And unfortunately there is no pressure, transition, etc.
I would like to build a system from beginning to end, stably preparing players for the game in a team.


Can you advise or recommend something to me? You have such impressive knowledge and I have no one to turn to anymore. Your site has given me a lot of knowledge. Thank!


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PostPosted: 05 Oct 2019, 04:58 
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Posts: 1157
Good questions.

Coaching is all about what you emphasis. There's only so much time to practice and players can only absorb so much. So the fact is that you can't be great at everything. If you try to be great at everything, you'll end up being mediocre at all those things.

So as a coach, you have to choose and decide on a small set of things you want to be great at. And accept that some things you'll be very mediocre because you don't spend much time on it. You'll find all the good coaches do this... their teams have identities that they can hang their hats on.

This might sound too simple, but if you want them to play as a team, you have to decide that is a priority and emphasize it constantly. If you emphasize teamwork and make it priority, you will make improvements and get better at it. Your players will pick that that it's important because you talk about it all the time.

On offensive, constantly emphasize passing, sharing the ball, ball reversals and so on.

Choose an offense that encourages teamwork and passing the ball.

I love motion offense and the "chaos" doesn't bother me. It makes us unpredictable and harder to guard. But some coaches need more structure, and that's ok. There are many different offense to choose from.

Here's an article about focusing on a few things:
https://www.breakthroughbasketball.com/coaching/three-things.html
https://www.breakthroughbasketball.com/coaching/philosophy.html

As an example, last season, my 13U girls team we decided to be unbelievably great at these things:
1) skill development
2) half court man to man defense
3) rebounding (boxing out and crashing weakside board on offense)
4) Special teams (an American football reference) scoring off BLOB plays and executing press breaker
5) Playing hard (which you have to do for defense and rebounding)
6) Playing together... sharing the ball, communicating, and working together on defense and offensive end

We ended up having a lot of success, having fun, and totally exceeded expectations. All the players bought in... which is key. We realized that we might not be a great transition offense team, we might not be great at full court press, we might not have the most polished offense int the world, we might not be fast, we might not be tall... but those 6 things above... we strived to be the best at. And we ended up getting pretty good at those 6 things.

Once you pick what you what you want to get really good at, let me know and I can point you toward really good resources.

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Jeff Haefner
http://www.BreakthroughBasketball.com


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PostPosted: 05 Oct 2019, 07:23 

Posts: 6
Thanks for the detailed and clear answer. I will change the emphasis and priorities.
Unfortunately, in Russia basketball chairsman demand an immediate result. In this regard, a question arises. Is it possible to use set plays to achieve an immediate result? Or is it worth using Motion offense to smoothly develop the qualities of the players? Or is it worth using some other attack?
I am ready to purchase products in your store, if you can recommend something?
Thank.

JeffHaefner wrote:
Good questions.

Coaching is all about what you emphasis. There's only so much time to practice and players can only absorb so much. So the fact is that you can't be great at everything. If you try to be great at everything, you'll end up being mediocre at all those things.

So as a coach, you have to choose and decide on a small set of things you want to be great at. And accept that some things you'll be very mediocre because you don't spend much time on it. You'll find all the good coaches do this... their teams have identities that they can hang their hats on.

This might sound too simple, but if you want them to play as a team, you have to decide that is a priority and emphasize it constantly. If you emphasize teamwork and make it priority, you will make improvements and get better at it. Your players will pick that that it's important because you talk about it all the time.

On offensive, constantly emphasize passing, sharing the ball, ball reversals and so on.

Choose an offense that encourages teamwork and passing the ball.

I love motion offense and the "chaos" doesn't bother me. It makes us unpredictable and harder to guard. But some coaches need more structure, and that's ok. There are many different offense to choose from.

Here's an article about focusing on a few things:
https://www.breakthroughbasketball.com/coaching/three-things.html
https://www.breakthroughbasketball.com/coaching/philosophy.html

As an example, last season, my 13U girls team we decided to be unbelievably great at these things:
1) skill development
2) half court man to man defense
3) rebounding (boxing out and crashing weakside board on offense)
4) Special teams (an American football reference) scoring off BLOB plays and executing press breaker
5) Playing hard (which you have to do for defense and rebounding)
6) Playing together... sharing the ball, communicating, and working together on defense and offensive end

We ended up having a lot of success, having fun, and totally exceeded expectations. All the players bought in... which is key. We realized that we might not be a great transition offense team, we might not be great at full court press, we might not have the most polished offense int the world, we might not be fast, we might not be tall... but those 6 things above... we strived to be the best at. And we ended up getting pretty good at those 6 things.

Once you pick what you what you want to get really good at, let me know and I can point you toward really good resources.


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PostPosted: 06 Oct 2019, 05:12 
Site Admin
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Posts: 1157
Teaching set plays can be effective, but they take time to learn. They give you more control over who shoots, when they shoot, and where they shoot. But you have to spend a lot of time practice them. And you need a bunch of set plays because the defense learns them and takes them away.

The exception would be a continuity offense or even certain called plays, where you teach players how to read the defense and react to that. So even though the defense knows what is coming, your players know how to read and counter the defense. An example of this would be the Princeton Offense.

How much practice time do you have each week?
What are the top 3-6 things you want to focus on and get great at?

Let me know and I'll try to suggest some resources.

_________________
Jeff Haefner
http://www.BreakthroughBasketball.com


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PostPosted: 06 Oct 2019, 05:35 

Posts: 6
Thanks!
We have 6 hours per week. 3 workouts for 2 hours.
Things i want to focus:
1) Offense (This included transition and half-court offense)
2) Man-to-man defense half-court (included pressure on half-court)
3) Teamwork (communicating, sharing the ball e.t.c)
4) Very agressive play (I would like to always put pressure on the player with the ball)
5) Press breaker (We often play pressure against our team and we often lose balls in simple situations)
6) This is the last point, because we have a short team and I prefer to play at a high pace.

JeffHaefner wrote:
Teaching set plays can be effective, but they take time to learn. They give you more control over who shoots, when they shoot, and where they shoot. But you have to spend a lot of time practice them. And you need a bunch of set plays because the defense learns them and takes them away.

The exception would be a continuity offense or even certain called plays, where you teach players how to read the defense and react to that. So even though the defense knows what is coming, your players know how to read and counter the defense. An example of this would be the Princeton Offense.

How much practice time do you have each week?
What are the top 3-6 things you want to focus on and get great at?

Let me know and I'll try to suggest some resources.


 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 06 Oct 2019, 07:15 
Site Admin
User avatar

Posts: 1157
For man to man defense, this is the best resource out there:
https://www.breakthroughbasketball.com/pr/huber-defense.html

For press breaker, here are a few resources to check out:
https://www.breakthroughbasketball.com/offense/press-breaker.html
https://www.breakthroughbasketball.com/play.asp?id=2118
https://www.breakthroughbasketball.com/play.asp?id=7798

For transition offense, it depends on what you run in half court. Here are a few good resources with slightly different philosophies:
https://www.breakthroughbasketball.com/pr/Fast-break-transition-kelbick.html
https://www.breakthroughbasketball.com/pr/schuring-offense-system.html
https://www.breakthroughbasketball.com/pr/haske-uptempo-system.html

If you want to run motion offense, both of these are excellent:
https://www.breakthroughbasketball.com/pr/schuring-offense-system.html
https://www.breakthroughbasketball.com/pr/kelbick-motion-dvds.html

Otherwise you can see other offense options here:
https://www.breakthroughbasketball.com/offenses.html

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Jeff Haefner
http://www.BreakthroughBasketball.com


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PostPosted: 06 Oct 2019, 08:26 

Posts: 6
Thank you very much!
You really helped me out, in the near future I will acquire man to man defense and full pressure and press break.
Thanks again!

JeffHaefner wrote:


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PostPosted: 17 Oct 2019, 13:30 

Posts: 6
Dear basketball coaches.
I would be grateful if you could help me with this solution.
The fact is that in the course of practice all the movements of the players are chaotic, everyone is trying to open to get the ball, but because of this there is no space for further development of the attack from the paint.
How do you solve this problem?

And there is still a moment, whether you can advise drills 2v0, 3v0, for fixing tactical-motor actions.
For example, when dribbling the ball in paint, which makes the 3rd located on 3-point lines. Or if there is a beat in the sideline, also the actions of the distant player. That is, various interactions of players to establish the right position, to create space.
Thank you very much.


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PostPosted: 18 Oct 2019, 07:29 
Site Admin
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Posts: 1157
I think you said the answer yourself. Two words...

Emphasize spacing.

That is the solution. There's not one or two or three drills I can pick that solves the problem. Spacing is something you just need to emphasize and continually work on. It takes time.

Sometimes just simple half court scrimmage is the easiest and most effective way to make progress. Tell them to make sure they maintain good spacing, then play 4v4 or 5v5 half court. When spacing gets messed up, yell "freeze". Then ask "how's our spacing? How can we improve our spacing?" If they don't know, show them how to space better.

Because you're right, if you have 4 guys all trying to get open cutting to the ball, you have a mess... no spacing. Spacing, spacing, spacing. The only times it's ok to not have spacing is when you a screening for a teammate. Then it's only a brief time players are close together.

For your last few questions, I think a couple simple concepts address all questions related to spacing:
1) maintain about 15 ft of spacing from each other
2) open passing windows and create angles so you can receive the ball

This applies to almost all situations. This drill shows an examples of where a post player can go if the ball is dribbled at them:
https://www.breakthroughbasketball.com/play.asp?id=7701

But where they go, doesn't really matter. Just follow the two concepts above... there are numerous places you can do depending on where your teammates are at. There is no right or wrong.

On the baseline dribble drive, a natural passing angle is usually in the other corner and players cutting in the middle of the lane. You just need 4 players spaced, opening passing windows, and using angles to receive the ball.

There is no "right spot". Just keep space and try to find an open window on the court.

You can find some spacing drills here:
https://www.breakthroughbasketball.com/drills/team-offense-drills.html

_________________
Jeff Haefner
http://www.BreakthroughBasketball.com


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PostPosted: 18 Oct 2019, 07:41 

Posts: 6
Thank you very much! You really helped me.
JeffHaefner wrote:
I think you said the answer yourself. Two words...

Emphasize spacing.

That is the solution. There's not one or two or three drills I can pick that solves the problem. Spacing is something you just need to emphasize and continually work on. It takes time.

Sometimes just simple half court scrimmage is the easiest and most effective way to make progress. Tell them to make sure they maintain good spacing, then play 4v4 or 5v5 half court. When spacing gets messed up, yell "freeze". Then ask "how's our spacing? How can we improve our spacing?" If they don't know, show them how to space better.

Because you're right, if you have 4 guys all trying to get open cutting to the ball, you have a mess... no spacing. Spacing, spacing, spacing. The only times it's ok to not have spacing is when you a screening for a teammate. Then it's only a brief time players are close together.

For your last few questions, I think a couple simple concepts address all questions related to spacing:
1) maintain about 15 ft of spacing from each other
2) open passing windows and create angles so you can receive the ball

This applies to almost all situations. This drill shows an examples of where a post player can go if the ball is dribbled at them:
https://www.breakthroughbasketball.com/play.asp?id=7701

But where they go, doesn't really matter. Just follow the two concepts above... there are numerous places you can do depending on where your teammates are at. There is no right or wrong.

On the baseline dribble drive, a natural passing angle is usually in the other corner and players cutting in the middle of the lane. You just need 4 players spaced, opening passing windows, and using angles to receive the ball.

There is no "right spot". Just keep space and try to find an open window on the court.

You can find some spacing drills here:
https://www.breakthroughbasketball.com/drills/team-offense-drills.html


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