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PostPosted: 26 Aug 2016, 11:04 

Posts: 6
Location: Lee's Summit, MO
I am going to take on the task of coaching my daughter's 5th grade parks & rec team this Fall. I've never coached this age or skill level (most of them are not that skilled). I have coached 8th grade girls for my middle school cut program, so this will be a change of pace for me.

I will have 1 hour of practice, twice a week on a half-gym.

Questions:

(1) What type of offense should I run with this age/skill of players? We are required to play half-court man defense.

(2) What types of drills would you suggest for this age/skill and gym format that I have access to?


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PostPosted: 30 Aug 2016, 09:22 
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I would run a very simple motion offense. Emphasize spacing and ball movement until you get a good shot. Keep it simple!

To give them some framework, you could start with basic pass and cut actions:
https://www.breakthroughbasketball.com/offense/cutters.html

For your half gym, how many baskets do you have for shooting? Let me know and I'll send some drill ideas.

Sorry we didn't reply earlier. For some reason I missed this one.

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PostPosted: 30 Aug 2016, 09:32 

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Location: Lee's Summit, MO
I will have 3 baskets on the half-gym. Thanks for the reply.


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PostPosted: 31 Aug 2016, 16:48 

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I'm sure Jeff will send along some good drills. Since you have limited time and court space, I would suggest incorporating a few multi-purpose drills that deal with teaching multiple skills. For example, there are drills on the site that have ball handling, passing, cutting and finishing. https://www.breakthroughbasketball.com/drills/multi-purpose-ball-handling.html

A few other suggestions. I would take a portion of one of the practices to deal with practical issues like inbounds plays. Not very long, just enough to get a simple inbounds play working before your first game.

Another suggestion for one of the practices. See if there's a similarly skilled team playing on the other half of the court that might be up for a 10 min scrimmage at the end of practice. I'm all about teaching fundamentals and working on skills in practice, but I also know the reality of what it's like in a game. Exposing the kids to a little bit of what a real game will be like helps. You can work out some of the major issues like getting back on defense, inbounds plays, spacing, etc. It can help before your first game.

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PostPosted: 31 Aug 2016, 19:53 
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I'm guessing a little on what these kids need... based on the description of 5th grade rec players that are not very skilled. In this case the majority of our time is spent on:

- footwork (pivoting and jump stops)
- all aspects of dribbling
- passing
- basic man to man defense fundamentals
- offensive spacing and cutting
- lay ups

At first we start with unopposed drills so players understand how to do basic front pivots, reverse pivots, jump stops, basic dribbling concepts, and so on.

Then we quickly move to game based drills once they get exposed to the basic terminology and concepts. We also move to as many multipurpose drills as we can to use time efficiently.

Here are a few drills that I would use:

https://www.breakthroughbasketball.com/play.asp?id=7701
https://www.breakthroughbasketball.com/play.asp?id=7599
https://www.breakthroughbasketball.com/play.asp?id=75
https://www.breakthroughbasketball.com/drills/1on1-grid-drill.html
https://www.breakthroughbasketball.com/drills/high-five-one-on-one.html
https://www.breakthroughbasketball.com/play.asp?id=7704
https://www.breakthroughbasketball.com/play.asp?id=1503

Beatem to the left. Set up cones where dribbler has to speed dribble (race) with weak hand and turn the corner to beat the defender.

Half court scrimmage – no dribble, 1 dribble, and 2 dribble limit

2v2, 3v3, 4v4 with various rules and emphasis — ball screen attacks, screen away, post ups, full court rugby, no dribble, etc, etc. Many of these drills can be found here:
https://www.breakthroughbasketball.com/store/shopexd.asp?id=129

Defensive shell drill.

Lastly, try to combine your team offense with skill work by taking a piece of your offense (ex: basket cut) and turn it into a skill building drill (passing, footwork, shooting, and/or lay ups).

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PostPosted: 01 Sep 2017, 10:56 

Posts: 3
Coaches,
I have taken on 6th & 7th grade girls basketball for the first time. Decided to implement the R&R offensive system. A decision made too late to give it the necessary practice time. We are having a HARD time scoring. Both teams are limited in fundamental skills and we are working diligently to improve them with only a couple of practice days per week. We see Man and Zone defenses. We are small in stature, therefore we receive half and full defensive pressure. Ball sureness, passing, and seeing open players are a few of our many offensive issues. Suggested Man and Zone offenses need to be simple and easy to implement. I have run mostly continuity in the past and like QH's that flow into continuity. Open to suggestions.

Thanks,
Mark


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PostPosted: 03 Sep 2017, 14:15 
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We run motion offense giving players with the intention of giving players freedom. The amount of freedom depends on our players that particular season. It takes about 20 minutes to implement. Then it's just a matter of teaching both individual and team fundament skills and concepts.

It's just based on spacing, ball movement, and player movement.

I have never been a continuity coach. But I know plenty of really good continuity coaches. I just have trouble finding the time needed to allocate to to the continuity and/or ball reaction offense.

When facing zone, we just make 3 very simple adjustments to our motion. I can elaborate more if needed.

With that said, if you want really simple and effective continuity versus zone, this is really good.
https://www.breakthroughbasketball.com/pr/kelbick-zone-offense.html

For continuity vs man... you could just go with the base layer of read and react. Pass, cut and fill. Or I think the flex offense is good for development and also effective if you teach it well.
https://www.breakthroughbasketball.com/pr/hybrid-flex.html

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PostPosted: 06 Sep 2017, 18:08 

Posts: 2
i've done what you're doing & it's gonna be ugly. you do not have enough time practice time to teach them how to become players. what you do have is the opportunity to teach them how to love the game. i would spend zero time teaching them defense. ZERO....just stay between their girl & the hoop. that's it.

i would spend the entire time teaching them to dribble and proper shooting technique, the fun parts of the game. at this level most kids want to have fun and i've seen plenty of kids get turned away from hoop by coaches that are trying to get them to understand and execute at levels college teams can't.

you should judge yourself by how many kids start the season and how many end it. if no kids quit, you've done a GREAT job


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