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PostPosted: 05 Jan 2010, 09:35 

Posts: 49
OK, well, my new years resolution is to be a starter on my school\'s JV basketball team. I am going to practice hard, but just one thing. I don't have any gyms to go to so I can work on my game. The best I can do is concrete, in my driveway. It's the only place. I have already had shin splints and I am recovering from them now. But I am asking is there any stretches I can do before I go out and practice on my driveway to avoid these shin splints and other injuries? I understand Vertical Jump and Plyometric work MUST be done on soft surface (grass) because of the incredibly high impact, but I will be just working on shooting and ball handling on my driveway ( stuff like change of direction and zig-zag drills) So how can I avoid an injury from practicing on concrete? Is it good to get a shock-absorbing shoe insert? Thanks, in advance


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PostPosted: 05 Jan 2010, 19:12 
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Do you have a trainer at your school? Maybe you could stop in and see her/him and ask for suggestions. Shin splints can be killers... I had them one year and it was constant pain.

If you look it up on the net you wont like what they tell you to do.... which is stay away from too much physical exercise...

In most cases, you can treat shin splints with simple self-care steps:

Rest. Avoid activities that cause pain, swelling or discomfort — but don't give up all physical activity. While you're healing, try low-impact exercises, such as swimming, bicycling or water running. If your shin pain causes you to limp, consider using crutches until you can walk normally without pain.
Ice the affected area. Apply ice packs to the affected shin for 15 to 20 minutes at a time, four to eight times a day for several days. To protect your skin, wrap the ice packs in a thin towel.
Reduce swelling. Elevate the affected shin above the level of your heart, especially at night. It may also help to compress the area with an elastic bandage or compression sleeve. Loosen the wrap if the pain increases, the area becomes numb or swelling occurs below the wrapped area.

Wear proper shoes. Your doctor may recommend a shoe that's especially suited for your foot type, your stride and your particular sport.
Consider arch supports. Arch supports can help cushion and disperse stress on your shinbones. Off-the-shelf arch supports come in various sizes and can be fitted immediately. More durable arch supports can be custom-made from a plaster cast of your foot.
It's also important to resume your usual activities gradually. If your shin isn't completely healed, returning to your usual activities may only cause continued pain.

Forgot this... stay off cement... find someplace else to work on your game.


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PostPosted: 07 Jan 2010, 11:03 

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As an older (36) overweight & out-of-shape player getting back into playing basketball, I can tell you that shin splints were killing me from the get-go. I quickly ordered some New Balance insoles (sport version) for around 38 bucks, and haven't had any shin issues since using them on their first day. I was amazed by the immediate result.

Now, although the patellar knee tendon strap has helped, my knees are still bothered tremendously by outdoor courts. So, I strongly agree with sars300 about staying off of cement.


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PostPosted: 07 Jan 2010, 15:03 

Posts: 49
but honestly, THERE IS NO OTHER PLACE where I can do do drils and workout peacefully and on my own terms privately. There is no other place besides my right in my driveway, where I do everything. So I guess I'lll buy the shock absorbing insoles because I have no soft surfaces to practice shooting and ball handling. I DO ALL MY HIGH-IMPACT PLYOMETRICS AND JUMP ROPE ON GRASS, I understand that part. But I can't shoot or dribble in the grass, so I must do them on concrete


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PostPosted: 07 Jan 2010, 15:18 
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How about a gym somewhere? IF you keep beating yourself up, you wont be able to work very hard.... and PAIN is a warning sign... don't ignore it. See your school trainer too along with getting those insoles.


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PostPosted: 07 Jan 2010, 15:25 

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we don't have a school trainer, but I know how to heal my injuries and my sister is a doctor and she'll help a little bit. well, I will rest to heal them. I'll do what I have to do. but when it comes to practicing, there is no gym where I can workout and do my drills independantly and peacefully, because nobody works on fundamentals in my town. All the courts are filled up with games, and there is no room to just work on skills independantly. that is why I wanted to get a shock absorbing insole so I can play at home peacefully, privately, and at the same time, I am getting better.


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PostPosted: 07 Jan 2010, 15:58 
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Hopefully your sister can give you some good advice then... I would agree with the insoles.... that should help a lot. I know that when I had shin splints I wrapped my legs with elastic bandages... looked pretty stupid but helped a little bit.

I wouldn't worry too much about what others are thinking regarding your workouts... you are doing whatever it takes to get better and thats the bottom line. While they are playing you are working on your skills.

I will ask the Doctors I know about stretching exercises.


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PostPosted: 07 Jan 2010, 16:35 
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The advice I got was -


Rest is generally the answer. However, I am of the opinion that something causes injuries; they don't just happen. Shin splints typically are associated with overpronation, flat feet and weakness on the muscles on the front of the shin, especially the anterior tibialis (more correctly, a muscle imbalance between the front and the back of the shin; tightness in the calves lead to reciprocal weakness in the front of the shin.

So more stretching of the calves is one way to help). One stretch that you can do is to stand on a step with your heels and do almost a reverse heel raise: lower your toes to extend your ankle and point your toe toward the ground.

Most athletic trainers simply subscribe rest and ice and while that will relieve the pain eventually, when the player resumes activities, whatever caused the shin splints the first time will not have been corrected


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PostPosted: 08 Jan 2010, 07:43 
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Here is what another coach told me...

My best player has shin splints and it has to do with his flat feet. He has gotten orthodics in order to help alleviate the problem. He also get his ankles taped which has seemed to help the issue slightly. Each day, he makes sure that he does his rehabilitative exercises that include ankle and foot strengthening exercises as well as stretching his calves. Hope this helps.


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PostPosted: 08 Jan 2010, 10:29 
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This I got from another coach -

I would like to add as a Podiatrist (and of course a coach). That the symptoms of "Shin Splints" which is just a generic term for pain in the front of the lower leg can also indicate a stress fracture of the Tibia. It is important to have it evaluated to rule out the possibility of a stress fracture before undergoing the treatment plan for the muscle strain of the anterior group of muscles.


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