Two Shooting Drills for the Tuck and Set Point

In the previous two articles, we discussed how...

You can read this and this to understand these concepts in more depth.

Now, in this article, I'm going to reveal an "old school" drill and second drill that I believe is vital for developing a great shot.

These will help you develop proper rhythm, timing, and coordination that players like Trae Young and Steph Curry use to knock down shots from long range.

Now, let's get to what looks like the good ole' triple threat drill.

One of the Most Underrated "Old School" Shooting Drills For Timing and Coordination - Get the Ball to Set Position!

You spin the ball to yourself, jog or run a few steps, gather the ball, and come to quick stop or 1-2 stop.

In addition to the spin, you can also practice the dribble.

You run and take one or two dribbles, gather the ball, and come to quick stop or 1-2 stop.

When you gather the ball, you immediately Tuck/cushion the ball and transition the ball to your set position. This is a quick, fluid motion.

At the same time, you drop your hips, load your legs, and get ready to extend to jump.

This is your ending position for the drill.

This is vital because it trains you to raise the ball to the set position prior to extending your legs to jump. And as discussed in a previous article, this is what elite shooters do!

If you start to extend your legs or jump before reaching the set position, it can create an awkward rhythm and timing with the shooting motion which results in less accurate shooting. This also reduces your shooting range.

Below is a video clip of the late Bob Bigelow taking you through a drill.

The drill would be similar to this. However, you would put an emphasis on immediately getting the ball to the set position.

As mentioned, you can also do spin outs or even just run with the ball and immediately transition to the set position in an athletic stance.

With the first progression, they just work on the quick stop without the ball. The dribbling progression starts at about 2:10.



Shooting Drill #2 - Teaches Players To Extend Their Legs to Jump When Ball Is At Set Point

Above, we practiced loading the legs and raising the ball to the set position.

Now, we have the next stage of the shot.

That's where you extend your legs and finish the shooting release from the set position.

The height of your set position can range from the shoulder level to your head level.

From the set position, great shooters extend their legs and finish their shot release.

Here you can see slow motion shots of Steph Curry, Diana Taurasi, and Larry Bird executing this.



You start the ball in your set position with your legs loaded ready to jump.

From this position, you extend your legs and shoot the ball at the same time.

This gets your body accustomed to feeling the position of when you should extend your legs and shoot the ball from the set point.

Here you can see it in action.

Please don't let the simplicity of these drills fool you into thinking they're not important... They are critical drills for becoming a lights out shooter!

As always, let us know if you have any questions or thoughts on the topic below.

Resources for Better Shooting

Breakthrough Basketball Shooting Camps

Shooting & Scoring System



What do you think? Let us know by leaving your comments, suggestions, and questions...




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Ivan says:
11/28/2021 at 6:06:36 AM

What words would you use to teach the shooting form?

What progressions?

It seems like the tuck means bring the elbow back, forearm parallel to the floor and load your hips.

When would the arms start moving up? How do you teach the timing? Then when the shooter gets to the set point the legs are extended? It seems to me in the videos that the legs start releasing as the ball is moving up.

What are your thoughts?





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