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PostPosted: 13 Nov 2015, 00:23 

Posts: 1
Hello!

My 15-year-old son is a relative newcomer to the world of basketball. He played a bit when he was younger and has recently taken an interest again since he started high school. Part of the reason is that he has had a huge growth spurt in the last year or two, going from average height to one of the tallest in his grade. He's pushing 6'4" right now in his basketball shoes.

A couple of his friends that were trying out for the basketball team convinced him to come along. It's a fairly small school, so pretty much everyone who tries out makes the team, but he was still very excited to make the cut.

I don't know too much about the finer details of the game, so I'm trying to learn more about his role as a post player. From what I've gathered, it's generally the tallest player on the team who plays close to the basket and tries to score there. It seems a lot different from his natural instinct of how to play, with more ball handling, jump shooting, etc. I guess he has to get used to using his height and size as an advantage and being more physical.

My main question at the moment is how he can keep getting better outside of practices and games. What kinds of drills can we do at home with the hoop in the driveway? That may seem a bit vague, but I think what we're really looking for are tips and guidance to steer him in the right direction as he learns this new position. He takes instruction well and loves to learn about the game, so I think he's definitely off to a good start.

Thanks for your help! :)


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PostPosted: 13 Nov 2015, 15:37 
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He needs to practice lots of footwork, ballhandling, finishing near the basket, and shooting technique. I would very highly recommend the following for all those things:

This is for the "how to" and "drills" he can do:
https://www.breakthroughbasketball.com/pr/attackandcounter.html

This does not tell you how to execute pivots properly, post up, or anything like that. But it gives you the exact drills and workouts to practice on your own. A good complement to the DVDs above but I'd start with the DVDs above first.
https://www.breakthroughbasketball.com/pr/acworkouts.html

Those products are not cheap but they are exactly what he needs. Maybe a Christmas present.

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PostPosted: 16 Nov 2015, 17:05 

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My favorite drills for all players, but especially bigger kids. Only thing I don't like about this vid is the first section with one ball - the player should be catching the ball at its highest point and going right back up. Two ball is tougher:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ycNqi-VTL5Q

A good video on some basics of posting up and post moves:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mA7TvmTZfH4

Drop step video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4bndda2KIVA

One of the better videos I've found on defending the post or really anyone trying to post up.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6JvsNiOGG6I

Last two suggestions. I wouldn't emphasize the "big guy" role to the point of losing sight of the guard skills. I highly recommend working on guard skills along with big guy skills. I've seen too many players get labeled as "big guys" early on and get pigeon-holed into that role. I think that's a mistake.

Along that same thought, if you have the resources and can find a good coach, I'd recommend some private lessons. If the coach is a good one, he'll understand the need for working with your son on improving his ball handling along with big guy stuff. It will pay off big time down the road.

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PostPosted: 16 Nov 2015, 19:23 
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This game with multiple offenses such as motion, dribble drive etc I believe all players should learn all positions. However, with that being said, if your son's growth spurt discontinues, there is little room for a 6'4" post player if he shows potential to move onto a college team. My suggestion is to learn all the positions both outside and inside. I made the mistake several years ago when I was coaching high school in Ohio, I had a 6'4" brute that for freshman basketball made a great post player, however, once I moved to varsity and he moved up with me, he had not grown and remained the same height as when he was a freshman. As a varsity post player, her was only average when facing much stronger and bigger players from other teams. Just a suggestion coach Mac


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PostPosted: 23 Apr 2016, 10:17 

Posts: 62
Great advice coaches...


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