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Video Clips and Diagrams of Two Ball Dribbling Moves & Drills

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Two ball dribbling drills dramatically increase a player's dribbling and ball handling abilities. It also helps a player develop great one on one moves. This happens because after you force your mind/body to perform a really difficult task (dribbling with two balls), an easier task (dribbling with one basketball) becomes much less difficult than it was before. It's sort of a mind trick, but in a good way.

As we all know and probably have heard a million times, a baby has to learn to crawl before it can walk. You should apply this same analogy to two ball dribbling. When a player first practices two ball dribbling, the player should do stationary dribbling. Some players may be ready to start moving with both basketballs within a minute. For some players, it could take a few weeks.


Two Ball Dribbling Videos:

If you want to view the drills, you can click on the links below. A video will pop up on the screen when you click on the link. There is a 3 or 4 second hesitation before the video starts.

Dribble While Catching Tennis Balls - Dribble laterally while catching tennis balls from a partner.

Two Ball Dribble - On the way down, alternate the dribbles between the left and right hand. On the way back, dribble the balls at the same time. This is similar to the descriptions of the Two Ball Pound and Alternating Dribble provided below.

Two Ball Low Dribble - Dribble the balls below your knees while weaving through the chairs. On the way down, dribble the balls at the same time. On the way back, alternate dribbles.

Two Ball High Dribble - This is the same as the Two Ball Low Dribble, except you dribble the balls at shoulder height.

Two Ball High-Low Dribble - Dribble one ball below your knees while dribbling the other ball at shoulder height. Switch hands on the way back.

Two Ball High-Low Alternate Dribble - Dribble low with one hand, high with the other around the chair. Switch low dribble hand and high dribble hand around each chair.

Two Ball Crossover Dribble - Crossover with both hands when you come to each chair.

Two Ball Weave Dribble - Weave in and out of the chairs dribbling forward to backwards and backwards to forward after every chair.


Here are some stationary & moving two ball dribbling moves:

  • Two Ball Pound - Dribble both balls at the same time. You can vary the height of the dribble from ankle, waist, and shoulder heights.

  • Alternating Dribble - As one ball hits the floor, the other ball should be reaching your hand. You can vary heights on this drill as well.

  • Crossover - Cross the two balls in front of your body at the same time.

  • Between the Legs & Crossover - Dribble one ball between your legs and cross over with the other one.

  • Hesitation - You should act like you're slowing down or coming to a stop, then explode out of the dribble as hard as you can.

  • Behind the Back & Crossover - Take one ball behind the back while crossing the other basketball in front.

  • Alternating Heights - Dribble one ball high while dribbling the other low.

  • Inside out with both balls

  • Spin with both balls

  • Behind back with one ball - crossover with the other

  • Behind back with one ball - through legs with the other

  • Backup dribble then crossover with both balls and explode forward


You can view a video on two ball stationary drills & workouts . It may also give you some other ideas for two ball dribbling moves.

Personally, I only think you should do the stationary drills for a few minutes before progressing to movement drills.

I like to use the stationary drills as a two or three minute warmup to get the upper body loosened up.


To use these drills in practice:
  1. Have your players along the baseline in 4 or more lines depending on the size of the court.

  2. On the whistle, the players dribble down with both basketballs.

    You can have them execute whatever dribble you choose (crossover, hesitation, etc.) at both free throw lines and half court.

    Another great way to improve reaction time is to have them perform the dribble on your whistle.

    You may have to partner up players to get enough basketballs.

Chairs & Cones:

You can also use chairs or cones. This adds another level of difficulty forcing the players to move side to side while performing the dribble moves.

For workouts with ball handling, shooting, guard play, post play, and more, check out the Attack and Counter Basketball Workouts developed by NBA skills coach Don Kelbick.







What do you think? Let us know by leaving your comments, suggestions, and questions...



Comments

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lorenzo says:
5/14/2018 at 9:58:04 PM

ya boi

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lorenzo says:
5/14/2018 at 9:07:45 PM

i think thi is lit im about to go to practice so i will tell the kids about this sups kool stuff

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Coach11 says:
7/24/2016 at 11:39:13 AM

I cannot watch the videos. They pop up, but when I hit play, it becomes a blank screen. I tried different ones multiple times. I am using a Mac and Safari. Thank you for your help.

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Amarachukwu says:
1/23/2015 at 11:32:10 PM

how do u do a layup

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  1 reply  

dobol ey says:
10/13/2014 at 9:14:52 AM

thanks 4 this page,t wil help us a lot..let share it to the youth!!

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Ken Sartini says:
6/8/2014 at 7:03:44 PM

It takes a lot of practice, plain and simple. Maybe spend a little more time with your left hand than you do with your right?

From Joe -

Joe Haefner says:
3/28/2012 at 7:59:59 AM
Ryan, my question to you is.. do you need more moves or do you just need to get better at your current moves?

If you watch the pros play, rarely do you see them have 50 different moves. Typically, they have a couple of REALLY good moves. They have their primary move (blow-by, hesitation, stutter, crossover, behind-the-back, inside-out, etc.), then they have a counter move to it.

When I played, I tried to practice 30 different moves because I thought more was better. Guess what happened, I became mediocre in all of the moves. And because I was only mediocre in those moves, they weren't effective.

It's much better to work on a few moves and PERFECT those moves. Work on them every day. You think your blow by move is good, get faster and get more efficient. You think your crossover is good, make it quicker.

By getting REALLY REALLY good at both of those moves, it will make you much tougher to stop.

Here is a little article on it as well: http://www.breakthroughbasketball.com/fundamentals/Chris-Paul-Hesitation-Move.html



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Ashraf says:
6/8/2014 at 6:49:47 PM

How can I make my left hand dribbling better? My right hand is pretty good but my left hand is terrible

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Jeff Haefner says:
2/4/2014 at 7:36:48 AM

Yes, I have found that 3rd and 4th grade girls can handle 2 ball dribbling. It can be a little ugly at first but with persistence they get it. However if you have an apprehensive beginner lacking lots of confidence, you might want to wait until they are ready.

And just like any drill, use 2 ball dribbling as a tool and a way to mix things up. Not something you want to do exclusively.

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kirk olsen says:
2/3/2014 at 3:45:53 PM

I coach 3 rd and 4th grade girls. Are the 2 ball dribble drills age appropriate for them?

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Jack swift says:
4/19/2013 at 4:10:22 PM

why did you ask that

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