Speed Up Your Release and Improve Accuracy with the "One Motion Shooting" Technique

One Motion Shooting is a technique that we really like because...

  1. Itís very simple to teach and learn -- one motion is less complex than the traditional way players learn to shoot.

  2. Itís very quick and efficient.

  3. Itís effective and can be used by any player (whether youíre an elite athlete or you struggle to touch the net).

Players like Stephen Curry, Steve Nash, and Diana Turasi all have quick and compact shooting motions -- allowing them to shoot very quickly and accurately without jumping as high as they can.

It's based on the premise that your shot should be "one fluid motion" from beginning to end. No hitches, pauses, or wasted movements.

One motion synchronizes body movements and energy flow.

We suggest you consider and learn about the One Motion Shooting Technique.

Hereís an introductory video explaining basic aspects of the technique.




Learn More About One Motion Shooting





Comments

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Bing says:
2/18/2016 at 8:11:38 AM

In the video of him shooting over the 6'8" player, he still takes a move to get the ball in the correct start point, wouldn't that count as a separate motion? Unless he's catching it in precisely the correct start point, it's never technically 'one motion', correct?

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Joe Haefner says:
2/18/2016 at 8:22:54 AM

I think the point is to make it as fluid, concise, and quick as possible from the beginning of the shot motion upwards. This will improve your shooting.

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Rick Penny says:
2/24/2016 at 11:05:16 AM

Bing,

Every shot has a starting point called SET. It's defined as the position of the body and ball just prior to the actual shooting motion starting (ball rising).

Each time a player shoots, he/she takes the ball to SET in preparation for the shot to begin. Moving the ball to the SET position doesn't count as a "movement" in the shooting process.

The purpose of this video is to show the quick release of One Motion starting at SET. It also demonstrates that you can get the shot off quickly and smoothly when closely guarded. I agree totally with Joe Haefner's comments.

Other techniques have SET positions that start the ball at waist level or below. It would be next to impossible to get their shot off with a defender standing as close as the young man in this video.

In live game action, SET is not a static point. The ball quickly moves up and through SET without stopping compared to other techniques that stop the ball at the "dip" before starting the shooting motion.

Hopefully this explanation has helped.

Rick Penny
www.onemotionbasketball.com

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Christian Burrell says:
2/26/2016 at 11:07:00 AM

Do you believe that the ball is raised to a certain point before the release up to the basket begins? With Curry, Nash, and Taursi the ball is kept mainly in front of their face so the ball necessarily doesn't go back as much but more up and towards the basket?

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Rick says:
2/26/2016 at 6:53:34 PM

Christian,

Great question!

I do believe there is a point at which the ball starts moving toward the basket. It's not an exact location, but usually it's when the upper arm nears a parallel position to the floor with the forearm being perpendicular to the floor...at least it is with the One Motion Technique. A ninety degree angle is created or an "L" position.

To me, the shooting motion consists of two parts. The first phase is the LIFT which means the ball is going up. As it rises, the upper arm nears parallel and, at that point, the ball begins to start toward the basket which is part two LAUNCH.

As the ball moves toward the basket, the upper arm continues to rise until full extension is reached at the wrist snap. Another way to describe this action is Up and At It.

Rick Penny
www.onemotionbasketball.com


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Mike says:
3/8/2016 at 12:42:42 PM

One concern I have with "One Motion" is that it doesn't consider last second variations considering the defense, such as a shot fake or a mid air pass. Seems like once you start the one motion you are committing to taking the shot

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Rick Penny says:
3/8/2016 at 3:55:12 PM

Mike,

Shooting is all about reading the defense and knowing when you're open for the shot attempt.

I don't fully understand your concern about players using One Motion and not being able to shot fake or make mid-air passes. My students do it all the time and I did the same during my playing career.

When you commit to taking a shot, no matter the technique, it is with the assumption that your open. Shot fakes take place when closely guarded and your trying to get the defender out of position in order to go around them or shoot.

Shot fakes are common to all techniques. Some of them begin each shot with the ball located at waist level or below (dip), then shot fake, and then immediately taking the ball back down to where it started (waist level or below) from before actually shooting.

One Motion does the same except, after the shot fake, the ball goes back to chest level (SET or starting point) before the shot takes place.

When open, One Motion will always have the quicker release because of it's starting point. The key is to shoot when open.

Last thing, with any technique players miscalculate from time to time as to how open they are. When this happens an adjustment is needed which involves a mid-shot pass or continuing the shot from a different angle.

Rick Penny
www.onemotionbasketball.com

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Joel Denny says:
3/8/2016 at 4:59:51 PM

Rick,

What are your thoughts on players that Dip before shooting?

http://focusedshooter.com/f-o-r-e-s-t/r-rhythm/

Thanks, JD

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Rick Penny says:
3/8/2016 at 9:10:28 PM

Joel,

Personally, I'm not a fan of the dip, but realize it's very popular these days.

For shooters that dip, it provides rhythm and power which are both necessary elements for good shooting.

One Motion derives those two elements by using the Tuck when shooting off the dribble or pass. Joe Haefner wrote an article on this very subject. In case you haven't seen it, here is the link:

https://www.breakthroughbasketball.com/fundamentals/shooting-secret-stephen-curry.html

(I devote a whole Chapter to the Tuck in my One Motion Shooting Technique Video)

I would never tell anyone they shouldn't dip because it's a personal preference. Students coming to me with a dip in their shooting motion quickly realize that One Motion has a better "feel" plus a quicker/smoother release.

Techniques that employ the dip are two-piece shots whereas One Motion is a one-piece shot. Both work, have rhythm, and power in the Shooting Process. I find that One Motion has better efficiency in terms of movement; thus a quicker release.

This article explains what I'm talking about and how certain techniques work:

https://www.breakthroughbasketball.com/fundamentals/shooting-arm-wrist-angle.html

I've seen the video you linked and it makes a strong case for dipping...can't deny that. I simply believe there is a more efficient way to shoot and that is One Motion.

Rick Penny
www.onemotionbasketball.com

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Kevin williams says:
12/2/2016 at 9:14:24 AM

Rick I'm new to one motion and I kinda get it but where should my set point be in the middle of my body, shoot from the shoulder area what area is best for a set point. I'm an amazing dribbler but I need a jumper people can respect.

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Rick Penny says:
7/4/2017 at 4:45:29 PM

Kevin,

The link below will take you to an article that shows basically where the SET position (Set Point) is located when using the One Motion Technique.

https://www.breakthroughbasketball.com/fundamentals/shooting-arm-wrist-angle.html

This is where I teach students to generally locate the ball before the actual shot begins.

Rick Penny
www.onemotionbasketball.com

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James Allen jr. says:
7/26/2017 at 4:00:31 AM

Good stuff coach! I'm 5'10" and this is the kind of shot I developed... after trying everything else.
It's a whole different timing and 'feel' that is more like free throw shooting (a set shot) than jump shooting in the traditional sense (shooting at the top of the jump).
So many people are teaching garbage these days online. Some even brag that they've compiled all the best shooters form and motions. Then they tell you how to shoot a basketball just from watching other people?... Garbage!

Shoot, Shoot, And shoot some more all you wanna be gurus... then tell me how to shoot.
I can't wait to look into more of your stuff, Breakthrough Basketball Guys!

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  1 reply  

Joe Haefner says:
7/26/2017 at 9:11:58 AM

Great point, James! Maybe we shouldn't teach a 5'10 guy to shoot the same as a 6'8 guy with a 40 inch vertical.

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Basket says:
3/24/2018 at 2:11:48 AM

In another video (how to get your perfect arc) you said that the elbow needs to rise above the set point. And in this video your arm needs to be in a L shape, parallel to the ground and you have no arc, so how do i get arc on my one motion shot?

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