The Duke Jerk Back Dribble Move - Create Separation And Explode By The Defense

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In this video, Jim Huber demonstrates The Duke Jerk Back Move that is taught in our Elite Guard Camps.

This move is a great way to create separation from an aggressive defender or trapping defenses.

If you don't work on creating separation and keeping your dribble alive, this can lead to a lot of unnecessary turnovers.

This move and habit needs to be practiced as it is very natural to pick up the dribble when two defenders come running at you... when this can be the worst thing that you can do.



In the first progression, you dribble with the same hand down the court. Then you switch hands on your second repetition.

In the second progression, you will execute the Duke Jerk Back then a change of direction dribble. You continuously do this up and down the court.


Emphasis Points & Tips:

Jerk back - When a defender or trap approaches, you "jerk" the ball back to your back hip. You do this to protect the ball from the defender.

Eyes on the rim - Also, emphasize keeping your eyes on the rim. This will help you develop the habit of seeing the floor.

Direct lines - You want to move in direct lines to cover distance more quickly. It's very natural to round your moves and become less efficient and slower. If you round your move, this allows your defense to have better angles to cut you off. You want to keep the defender on your back.

Body to body - This is similar to "direct lines". You want to imagine a defender is front of you. And you want to imagine your move taking you directly by the defender's hip. If you can, you can even have a defender play dummy defense to practice this.



What do you think? Let us know by leaving your comments, suggestions, and questions...





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Comments

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James says:
4/25/2016 at 12:40:10 PM

Is this on a DVD?

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Joe Haefner says:
4/26/2016 at 6:38:08 AM

Hi James,

No. They are not on a DVD. These are some video clips from our camp curriculum that we share with our coaches.

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Keith says:
5/2/2016 at 8:51:48 AM

Thanks for sharing. I have been teaching this move for a couple of years. Players are inclined to stop their dribble on traps. It is also a great one on one move.

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