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PostPosted: 24 Mar 2016, 11:53 

Posts: 2
I am curious about Don's opinion of shooting guns. You can get a good volume of shots in a short period of time but you are receiving passes from the same spot below the basket every time. Not very game realistic. I've used it in team drills with one line receiving the gun pass and then passing it to a shooter. Do you ever use guns? If so, what do you drill with it?


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PostPosted: 28 Mar 2016, 11:05 
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Location: Miami, Fl.
There was a time where I really didn't like them, but now I do.

While it is true that anything that gets players in the gym is a good thing, I did not like them because of my philosophy of practicing game situations. Coaches like to say "Practice at game speed. Practice game shots!" But I don't know any situation where the ball gets passed from under the net to a player on the perimeter who has done nothing to create his shot other than wait for the ball.

That is what happens when most players use a shooting machine, with or without coaches. They set the machine under the rim, put the net up to get rebounds, stand outside and wait for the ball to come back out.

When I now work out with a shooting machine, the machine passes the ball back to me, the player makes whatever game type action to get his shot and I pass him the ball.

As I progressed, I realized that putting it under the basket was the worst place to put it. I now move it out to the perimeter, have players make game moves (V cut, L cuts, fast break sprints) and have the machine make the pass.

It is especially effective in the post, where you can put it out on the wing, have it feed the post, make a post move and then throw the ball back into the net so it can pass another ball.

I used to think it was cumbersome (and it is) so I didn't like the older Dr. Dish, but now I do. It is fully programmable so you can control where, how often, how hard, the passes come. You can control the type of pass (chest, bounce, lob, etc.), time between passes, the number of reps for a drill. It will rotate to different spots and it gives a 2 sec warning before the pass, you you know when to act. With the older ones, the rebounding net and the passing machine were separate pieces. So, I set the net to collect rebounds with a ball cart underneath it to collect the balls. I load the passing machine with the ball feeder (also a separate piece in the old machines) with 10-14 balls and move it on the perimeter and have it pass so we can make real game type movements for shots. When the ball feeder is empty, we roll the ball cart out to the passing machine, load it up again, replace the cart and go back to work. If I have multiple players, or a team, I have someone stand under the backboard and have him throw it back to feed the machine, as the ball comes through the net. He no longer has to chase down rebounds because they are fed to him.

The new Dr. Dish, nor the Gun have that feature so someone has to chase down the rebounds. But, I find that preferable than having players pass he ball. The new Dr. Dish has a reversible net so you can turn it around to make it easier to pass it into the net, such as in post work, the post player can pitch out back to the machine.

If you want specific drills, let me know.

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PostPosted: 29 Mar 2016, 09:56 

Posts: 2
Thanks Don. A few specific drills would be very helpful.


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PostPosted: 25 Apr 2016, 19:59 
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Location: Miami, Fl.
Sorry this took so long. I'm not sure they made it to you when I first sent them

Here are some shooting machine drills that I do:
https://www.breakthroughbasketball.com/play.asp?id=7873

In reality, it was pretty tough to draw them up because all I do is take pieces that I feel are important and make a drill out of it. I am not really big on standard drills, or even drills that I did when I was younger. I as I progressed I began to feel that those drills were more style than substance. I like to take pieces of an offense that a player plays in and use that. That way it is directly relatible to his game.

Keep a few other things in mind:

These are not the only drills you can do. Look at what you do and make it fit your philosophy.
You don't have to do them the way I do. I believe in getting players high numbers of reps in a short period of time. That means one player goes over and over again, for a prescribed amount of reps (or time). I will go out of my way to avoid putting players in a line and having them go one after the other. While one player is going, the others can rebound, shoot fouls at another basket or do other drills. Not everybody likes that. I have heard comments like, "I don't like the other players standing around while one player shoots." In reality, if they stand in line they not only wait more, in total time, but they do less reps.


That's just my philosophy.


Attachments:
Gun Shooting Drills.pdf [208.9 KiB]
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PostPosted: 02 May 2016, 13:36 

Posts: 62
Nice stuff here.


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