Free Throw Shooting Workout
With Videos and Drills

Home > Player > Workouts > Free Throw Shooting Workout

Good free throw shooting can be the difference between a winning season and a losing season. It can be the difference between a championship or a first round exit.

Due to the importance of being a good free throw shooter, many dedicated players will spend a lot of time practicing.

Most players will shoot free throws in blocks of 10, 20, 50, etc. This is great for developing the skill of shooting free throws. It strengthens neural circuits, improves confidence, and improves energy efficiency.

A great way to do this is to use the Steve Nash Free Throw Shooting Drill. The same drill the UConn men's basketball team used during the 2014 National Championship run.


But Should You Do MORE To Improve Free Throw Shooting?

How often do you shoot 10 consecutive free throws in a game? In most occasions, you shoot 1 or 2 free throws. Sometimes, you will shoot 3.

You never shoot 10 in a row.

I'm not dismissing the importance of shooting in high quantities like in the Steve Nash shooting drill. That is important too.

However, you should definitely add more game-like free throw shooting to your routine.


The Free Throw Shooting Workout

This is a normal shooting workout.

The only difference is that you take 3 to 5 game shots for each round. And you follow that with 2 to 3 free throws .

Maybe even mix in some 1-and-1 situations.

It's also very important for you to chart your shots. You'll most likely see that with the free shooting workout, your percentage may be lower compared to when you shoot high quantities in a row.

After some practice, you should narrow the gap.

While it's nearly impossible to simulate game-like situations when it comes to shooting free throws, this should lead to improvement in free throw shooting for you.

Download Free Throw Shooting Workout


Here is how you would do this with a Perimeter Shooting Workout that we previously sent.

Form Shooting - One Hand - 20 Shots
Form Shooting - With Guide Hand - 30 Shots
Short Long - Top - 30 Shots
One Game of Seven - Approx 20 to 50 Shots

Block to Right Wing - Mid Range - 4 Shots
2 Free Throws
Block to Right Wing - Mid Range - 4 Shots
2 Free Throws
Block to Right Wing - Mid Range - 2 Shots
1-and-1 Free Throw

Block to Right Wing Long Distance - 4 Shots
2 Free Throws
Block to Right Wing Long Distance - 4 Shots
2 Free Throws
Block to Right Wing Long Distance - 2 Shots
1-and-1 Free Throw

Block to Left Wing - Mid Range - 4 Shots
2 Free Throws
Block to Left Wing - Mid Range - 4 Shots
2 Free Throws
Block to Left Wing - Mid Range - 2 Shots
1-and-1 Free Throw

Block to Left Wing Long Distance - 4 Shots
2 Free Throws
Block to Left Wing Long Distance - 4 Shots
2 Free Throws
Block to Left Wing Long Distance - 2 Shots
1-and-1 Free Throw

Block to Right Wing - 1 Dribble Shot - 4 Shots
2 Free Throws
Block to Right Wing - 1 Dribble Shot - 4 Shots
2 Free Throws
Block to Right Wing - 1 Dribble Shot - 2 Shots
1-and-1 Free Throw

Block to Left Wing - 1 Dribble Shot - 4 Shots
2 Free Throws
Block to Left Wing - 1 Dribble Shot - 4 Shots
2 Free Throws
Block to Left Wing - 1 Dribble Shot - 2 Shots
1-and-1 Free Throw

Block to Right Wing - 2 Dribble Change - 4 Shots
2 Free Throws
Block to Right Wing - 2 Dribble Change - 4 Shots
2 Free Throws
Block to Right Wing - 2 Dribble Change - 2 Shots
1-and-1 Free Throw

Block to Left Wing - 2 Dribble Change - 4 Shots
2 Free Throws
Block to Left Wing - 2 Dribble Change - 4 Shots
2 Free Throws
Block to Left Wing - 2 Dribble Change - 4 Shots
1-and-1 Free Throw

Ray Allen Shooting Drill - 2 Games - 50 to 70 Shots


For a longer description of each drill, you can click on the following links or watch the videos below.

Short Long
Two Games of Seven
Block to Wing - Shot, 1 Dribble, 2 Dribble Change
Ray Allen Shooting Drill


Short Long




Seven - 1:25 to 2:49




Block To Wing - Shot - 0:15 to 0:35

Block To Wing - 1 Dribble Shot - 1:12 to 1:47

Block To Wing - 2 Dribble Change Shot - 2:29 to 3:05




Ray Allen Shooting Drill






What do you think? Let us know by leaving your comments, suggestions, and questions...




Comments

Most Likes First   Oldest First   Newest First

Joe Haefner says:
7/22/2014 at 3:55:50 PM

Hi Miguel, to drills by yourself, you can start out by placing the ball on a chair or spinning the ball to yourself prior to the cut.

Here are more drills for players:
http://www.breakthroughbasketball.com/drills/basketball-drills-players.html

Like
   

Miguel Campaner says:
7/22/2014 at 10:55:50 AM

Great information!

I was wondering if you know any effective drills (shooting, dribbling, defending) that could be done alone?

Thanks and more power!

Like
   

Bob Heidkamp says:
7/2/2014 at 11:33:18 AM

Here''''s a game for daily summer practice on your own that develops clutch FT shooters. It''''s called "Gamewinners". Do this after your AAU or summer league games when you are tired. Go through your team''''s upcoming schedule. Opponent #1: Kettering Alter. You were fouled at the buzzer and you''''re on the FT line with no time left and a one-and-one opportunity that will win the game. Make ''''em both, you just beat archrival Kettering Alter. Miss the first, your team obviously loses. Miss the second, you lost it in OT. Go on to the next team on your schedule, until you have had the opportunity to beat everybody you play throughout the season. You will learn to focus and become better and more confident as time goes on. You''''ll become the guy who wants to take those crucial free throws at crunch time. FT shooters aren''''t made during the winter. They''''re made in the offseason. Every close game is won or lost at the foul line. Exactly how good of a FT shooter do you want to become? It all starts right now, in July. Every team you''''ll play, every day. "I''''m on the line with a one-and-one with a chance to beat Greenhills high school in the Regional Final, and send our team to the State..."

Like
   

Ken Sartini says:
7/2/2014 at 9:06:42 AM

Great information Joe -

In our practice sessions we always shot after doing a tough drill, 1 & 1s. If they missed any part of that, they had to run up and back, dribbling a ball.

During summer sessions there times some kids would come in and shoot 1,000 before camp started... 10 at a time shooting 100 . Take a short break and do it all over.

We felt like this developed good muscle memory and I don't have to tell you who shot T fouls or who had the ball in their hands late in the game.

One summer this kid that just entered 6th grade made 92 out of 100 free throws... and he was a great kid too. One of my X player who lives in Florida has a 10 year old son who is a Bball junkie... he can really shoot the ball, learned it all from his dad I am sure.

Like
   

Leave a Comment
Name
:
Email (not published)
:
Eleven minus seven is equal to?  (Prevents Spam)
Answer
:
 Load New Question
Comments
:
Leave this Blank
:
    Check this box to receive an email notification when someone else comments on this page.