Competitive Chair Rip Drill Used To Improve Footwork, Ball Handling, and Finishing At The Basket

SHARE
Share on Facebook Tweet This Share on Linkedin Share via Email Print
Home > Coaching > Drills > Footwork > Competitive Chair Rips
This is a great competitive drill where you can work on footwork, covering length with minimal dribbles, and finishing at the goal. It also simulates getting a defender on your hip while working on an explosive first step.



Place a chair on the perimeter. The chair should be at an angle, so the side of the chair is square to the basket with the back of the chair facing the defender and the front of the chair facing towards the offensive player.

The offensive player starts near the top of the key. The defensive player stands behind the chair with their right foot in the center of the chair, facing the offense.

The offense player jump stops at the chair, picks up the ball, then executes what ever pivot you want to work on. It could be a step through, a sweep, or a drop step.

The defensive player goes when the offensive player picks up their swing foot and it's live.

We give the offensive player 6 attempts and then offense and defense switch. Then we go to the other side of the floor.

For variations, you can move this chair all over the floor and have the chair face different directions to simulate other game situations.

Coaching Tips

  • On a step through pivot, the player rips the ball below the chair and takes an explosive first step straight to the front of the rim.
  • Shoulders at level of defensive player's hips.
  • Drive foot into ground.
  • Get foot quickly back to the floor.
  • Extend dribble.





SHARE
Share on Facebook Tweet This Share on Linkedin Share via Email Print
What do you think? Let us know by leaving your comments, suggestions, and questions...



Comments

Most Likes First   Oldest First   Newest First

Bruce Aulabaugh says:
2/13/2012 at 8:51:12 AM

Please check my understanding of the footwork options for the offensive player:
1) push off the outside foot, using the inside foot to step and lead to the basket or
2) step to the basket with the outside foot, using the inside foot as the pivot foot or
3) drop step (swing) with inside foot to 'square' up then step to the basket with the swing foot.
thanks and keep up the good work.

Like
   

Jeff Haefner says:
2/14/2012 at 10:59:14 AM

Bruce,

We usually just focus on one pivot at a time. We might tell the players we are just working on "step through pivots". We might progress to another pivot in that practice or wait until the next day to practice another pivot.

Regarding the pivots...

Step Through - foot closest to the basket is pivot foot (stays planted), foot farthest from basket swings/steps toward the basket.

Sweep - foot farthest from the basket is pivot foot, foot closest is swing foot stepping toward the goal.

Drop step - foot closest to basket is pivot foot (stays planted), other foot swings in reverse extending to the basket (it's kinda like a reverse pivot except you are extending your swing foot trying to get your hip past the defender - Larry Bird was good at this on the perimeter).

Like
   

Joe Davis says:
2/14/2012 at 12:16:48 PM

I'm not sure I get this. #1, where is the ball at the start of the drill? "The offensive player jump stops at the chair and picks up the ball..." Is it on the floor right in front of the chair? Is on the seat of the chair by the defender's foot?

#2, the back of the chair is facing the defender, so how is he sticking his foot on the chair? Are you assuming the chair has a gap between the back and the seat for him to put his foot through? Why not have the front of the chair face him and put his foot on the seat?

Why is the defender here? Instead of here?

Like
   

Jeff Haefner says:
2/14/2012 at 1:09:46 PM

Joe -
The ball is sitting on the seat of the chair. The defender just stands behind the chair (not touching it). We generally have the defenders outside foot positioned at about the middle of the chair (but you can position the defender closer or farther from the basket). We have found having the defender with their foot pointing to the middle of the chair gets them at about the right distance to get them on the hip of the offense and make it a challenge. This is just a 1on1 drill simulating the defender on the hip. We have found using a chair makes it really effective in simulating the situation we want (not to mention it helps improve offensive footwork).

Like
   

Randy says:
5/19/2013 at 1:47:12 PM

Is offense driving to hoop or doing pull-up jumper or shooter's choice?

Like
   

Randy says:
5/19/2013 at 1:47:13 PM

Is offense driving to hoop or doing pull-up jumper or shooter's choice?

Like
   

Ken Sartini says:
5/19/2013 at 5:53:41 PM

I would say shooters choice, taking what the defense gives you.

Like
   

Leave a Comment
Name
:
Email (not published)
:
Sixteen minus four is equal to?  (Prevents Spam)
Answer
:
 Load New Question
Comments
:
Leave this Blank
:
    Check this box to receive an email notification when someone else comments on this page.