Man-Maker Drill

Categories: Ballhandling / Dribbling  Offense (Team)  Passing  Transition  
Ages: All Ages  Youth  Middle School  High School+  

Purpose of the Drill:

This drill was passed on by our good coaching friend, Ken Sartini (AKA Coach Sar).

This drill is great to improve your team's ability to break pressure. It improves passing, moving without the ball, footwork, utilizing ball fakes, spacing, and much more.

Instructions

  • Start with 3 offensive players on the baseline and 3 defensive players on the free throw line extended.
  • The one defensive player in the middle has the ball, he/she passes it to the player on the baseline and then the drill begins.
  • Split the half court into thirds and the offensive players must stay in their lanes.
  • The offensive players have to advance the ball past half court WITHOUT dribbling.
  • There is no 10 second or 5 second violation. They just have to keep working until they get the ball over half court without turning it over. They can pass, make cuts, cut and replace, bump the defender to freeze him and get open whatever way they can.
  • Once they get the ball past half court, they play 3 on 3.







Comments

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Ben Mitchell says:
6/2/2011 at 11:52:53 AM

Drill sounds good but confused "They can pass, make cuts, cut and replace," if they have to stay in lanes how can they replace?

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Brian says:
6/2/2011 at 12:37:28 PM

I'm wondering the same thing. I understand the concept of staying in the lanes but that doesn't give much of an option of where to cut.

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Tim says:
6/2/2011 at 1:02:26 PM

I believe that when you make the cut and the ball is pass that the passer then replaces the cutter to continue filling all lanes. If I am wrong please correct me.

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Shae says:
6/2/2011 at 1:08:52 PM

I believe they are saying if someone cuts then another player has to fill their spot. No 2 players can be in one lane at the same time, all three spots have to be filled at all times.

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Keshaun says:
6/2/2011 at 1:18:38 PM

It seems as if the drill is ran almost like a 3 man weave but with defense. After you advance past half court your free to roam anywhere.

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Coach D says:
6/2/2011 at 1:34:27 PM

"Cut and replace" in this drill refers to the cutter replacing himself within the lane.

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Ken Sartini says:
6/2/2011 at 7:41:21 PM

The offensive players MUST stay in their own lane.... the idea of this drill is to toughen up your players... learn how to protect the ball without turning it over. This IS one tough drill and its meant to be.
Coach D answered your cut and replace questions...
Brian, you are right, not much of an option as to where you can cut and go... but that makes them work all the harder.... trust me, it can be done, our kids did it and our D was relentless.
No weave allowed, no changing of lanes allowed... they MUST stay in their own lanes.
You want tough kids that wont turn the ball over easily, run this drill a lot... I hated turnovers.... this helped us a lot.

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Coach Huston says:
6/3/2011 at 12:53:31 PM

I have watched this drill run by a local coach,and it had many good attributes.
If you play 3 on 3 after crossing mid-court, I suggest that you only allow dribbling if it can be utilized going towards the basket. It seems that factor would contribute more to emphasizing the importance of passing.

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Damon says:
6/6/2011 at 9:37:30 PM

@Coach Sar: Ever used or seen this drill used with an 8th grade girls team? I just see most of my 8th grade girls NOT being able to beat the pressure without leaving their lane or without dribbling. Sounds tough!

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Ken Sartini says:
6/7/2011 at 9:42:55 AM

Damon,
No doubt about it, this is a tough drill, for any age group. But think of it this way, everything is relative - 8th grade girls vs 8th grade girls.... and while it might take them awhile to master this.... it certainly WILL help them in the long run. They will be able to handle pressure, they will learn how to get open, they will learn to PROTECT the ball and NOT turn it over... all positives.... just don't expect miracles right away.

Our rule was to take the 10 second count if need be, we can always play D vs them taking the ball out of bounds on the side... hard to defend breakaway lay ups.

As for allowing dribbling AFTER they get the ball past half court... nothing wrong with that... anything that allows you to teach the game and make the drill more fun, go for it.

There were times that we played 5 on 5 full court NO DRIBBLING but we allowed them to cut anywhere they wanted to go to get open. Its a lot of fun watching varsity players master this... at first they catch it and put it on the floor instead of a jump stop... but eventually, they got it and did it pretty well.

Here is another thought for this drill... but you need another coach working with the defense... remember, there is NO 10 second violation but you can work the defensive side by using a stop watch - making a goal of keeping the ball in the back court for 10 seconds....

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Araba says:
2/14/2013 at 9:28:24 PM

I like dat

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