3 Cone - Groove Finishing Drill

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This is an efficient drill to work on dribbling and get lots of finishing reps.  We use this drill to "groove" our shots and get a high number of repetitions working on various finishing shots.   The drill is very simple but there are some subtle differences when compared to most lay up drills.  First, players dribble from different distances on every shot to provide more game-like variable training. Second, it is very efficient allowing for high number of repetitions. Some of the finishing moves you can designate include: - basic lay up - shoulder finish (hook shot) - reverse lay up - two foot push shot - one foot runner - high off the glass bank - goofy (outside foot jump) - inside hand finish - extension finish
Drill Instructions Line up cones as shown (around 12, 15, and 22 ft from basket).  Every player has a ball. Line up as shown.   First player dribbles around cone with right hand and shoots a lay up.  Then goes to end of line.  
Frame 1
When first player reaches cone, next player starts.   It should be fast paced and very little standing in line -- getting a high number of reps in short time.   You can designate a variety of different finishing moves (shoulder finish, high off the glass, push floater, etc).  
Frame 2
On the second repetition, the player will dribble around the 2nd cone. On third repetition, dribble around 3rd cone. And then repeat starting back at first cone.  This gives players some variable training so the distance and footwork required changes on each repetition.  It also allows players to get lots of reps since the cones are close to the basket.  
Frame 3
Once players have completed desired number of reps, move the line and have them dribble and shoot with their left hand.  
Frame 4
Key Points of Emphasis
  • It's important that players go full speed.  
  • We encourage players to pound the ball (smash it into ground) on way "out" to the cone and push the ball out (minimizing dribbles) on way "to" the basket. 
  • Vary the location of cones (move toward top, to corner, etc) for each practice.  This gets players used to shooting lay ups coming at different angles that they might experience in a real game.  




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