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PostPosted: 12 Jan 2010, 18:01 

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As a girls basketball player eduring the off season, I was just wondering if anyone had any tips for the off season, like to stay in shape? Thanks!


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PostPosted: 12 Jan 2010, 19:31 
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This is something I found for you.... but I would add more shooting to this.

45-Minute Basketball Workout
By Sharon Fanning
Mississippi State Basketball

Offseason conditioning is a key element in being a successful Division I athlete. At Mississippi State, the coaching staff leads their team through a series of fundamental workouts with and without the basketball.

Within the spring and summer the team spends up to four hours a week in the gym and four hours in the weight room improving their physical strength. The following 45-minute workout should be preformed three days a week. Developing confidence, coordination, strength, timing, and stamina is the athlete's main focus throughout the workout.

I. Defensive Slides/Three minutes - (width of free throw line) three sets: 30 seconds on/off (27 is great)

II. Backboard Taps/Six Minutes - (with ball) 40 in a row: 10 right/left/alternating/both, rest 30 seconds, repeat three sets

III. Backboard Touch/Three minutes -- Start at free-throw line, sprint and slap backboard with both hands (net), sprint back and touch free throw line, repeat: 30 seconds on/off: 3 sets (11-plus is great)

IV. Mikan/Three minutes - (Hook right and left) 30 seconds on/off: three sets (17-plus is great)

Want More Workout Ideas?
Check out Active.com's
Guide to Basketball Conditioning
for more tips, drills and
philosophies from the experts.

V. Shooting Drill "10"/Six minutes - Begin at court 10 feet inside sideline; sprint and receive pass at one of 10 spots; if make, sprint out and touch court on opposite side and then come back for second shot on that side; repeat side to side until you follow shot and get your own rebound-shoot until you make it; then sprint out to touch court. If it is made, passer will rebound for you. Rest one minute and repeat, three sets. Shoot with in your range; vary spots.

VI. Heavy Rope or Regular Rope/Five minutes -- Alternate skips after 25 repetitions...run the rope...begin with right foot only/left/both/alternate/scissors/cross feet/twice under/crossover with arms: then repeat everything with rope in opposite direction (jump backwards) Note: Follow heavy rope directions only for regular jump rope

VII. Square Pick Ups/Three minutes -- One ball placed on first line up from block on each side of free throw lane. Begin picking up one ball and shoot a power lay-up. Your partner will rebound and put ball back on the line. You will get the other ball and shoot another power lay-up. Your rebounder will get that ball and put it back on the line. Repeat. Go 30 second and rest 30 seconds. Repeat three sets. (18-plus is good)

VIII. Hot Shots/Five minutes-- Tape the floor at these spots: 5 is 20 feet, 4 is 15 feet, 3 is 10 feet, 2 is lay-up. Shoot for one minute and keep up with the buckets you make and add up your score. Keep up with your best score. You must dribble as you go to each spot-can't run with the ball. Three sets--one minute each.

IX. Speed Lay-ups/Three minutes -- Begin under bucket, dribble out to "T" and come back in for a lay-up. Repeat to other side. Try to use only one dribble out and one dribble back...30 seconds on/off: three sets

X. 5 Sprints in 5 Minutes/Five minutes-- Work toward 30-32 seconds per sprints. Begin baseline, sprint to nearest free throw line and back to base line, then to court and back to baseline, then to the opposite free throw line and back, now to the opposite baseline and back. (Under 30 seconds is great) If is takes you more than that, rest until one minute is up. Remember, you want to complete five in five minutes.

XI. Around the Waist/Three minutes-- Take ball around waist in one direction for 30 seconds (50-plus is good) Change directions next time three sets of 30 seconds on/off

XII. Summary

A. 45-Minute Workout...three days a week
B. Be creative: develop confidence, coordination, strength, timing, and stamina
C. Work on dribbling, ball handling, or other specifics 10-15 minutes per day


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PostPosted: 12 Jan 2010, 21:07 

Posts: 7
Thank you so much! I will definatley comit to this workout!


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PostPosted: 12 Jan 2010, 21:10 
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You're welcome.. good luck - I hope this helps you.


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PostPosted: 13 Jan 2010, 08:39 
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Location: San Antonio
I think that is definitely a good start. I think you need to personalize the workout as well. What did you struggle with during last season? Would do you feel needs to improve or what did your coach tell you needs to improve?

General workouts are good but you need to take personal inventory of your own game as well and make plans to develop it.

I would be willing to help more if you have any questions. Also if you're looking for a great scoring workout go to www.spartanpt.com/advancedscoring

_________________
Coach Springer
Founder/Head Coach
Spartan Basketball
http://www.spartanpt.com/blog


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PostPosted: 13 Jan 2010, 11:32 
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Posts: 191
Location: New Britain, CT.
Sammy,

I'm a big believer in the adage:
"Winter is the time to play basketball, spring and summer is the time to get better in basketball."

Some great tips and advice you got on conditioning and I feel you should follow those tips and customize them to your personal needs as the coaches advised.

Aside from staying in shape you still should look to continue playing competitive basketball in the off-season. If anything to maintain your current skill level or to improve upon your skill sets.
I would look into playing for an AAU team during the months of April, May and into June. Then take some time off for a month or so then look into some summer basketball camps and clinics.

Now AAU hoop is not for everyone. You may need a break after your winter league and you don't want to suffer basketball burn-out. But if you feel you'd like to continue playing competitive ball
on a different team facing different competition then maybe AAU could be your path to staying in basketball shape, gain valuable experience and improve your skills. AAU is a big committment and can be expensive for some families.

Another option of off-season conditioning is running cross-country for your school. I think it is a fall sport so that could be a good primer to stay in shape for winter hoop. I know a few girls that do that it has really improved their basketball endurance.

I currently coach 8th grade girl's travel and U13 girl's AAU.
My daughter, Emily, 13, loves AAU. She says it's a fun break from her school teammates and the same competition. Some of her best friends are from meeting them in AAU ball.


Good Luck Girl!!

Coach A


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PostPosted: 13 Jan 2010, 11:42 
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Some more great advice here from Coach A and Springer ...

I just might add this... do what is comfortable for you ... pick and choose from the things here.... but like I said at first... make sure you shoot a lot...

Don't burn yourself out on just one sport.... you only go through high school one time.... enjoy yourself and all the things that they offer at your school.

Now, IF you think you can get a scholorship for a sport... work hard at that sport to be the best that you can be.... IF not... enjoy yourself and do all the other stuff too.


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PostPosted: 13 Jan 2010, 16:34 
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Location: Winter Garden, FL (Orlando suburb)
Yeah. I agree with a lot of the same advice here. If you choose AAU, make sure you find a coach who works on skills and isn't just games, games, games. Too many games can cause injuries and your skills can actually diminish. If you're lucky, you get 10 to 15 shots during the game and handle the ball for a couple of minutes. During a skill session, you can get in 250 to 400 shots with plenty of ball handling.

I've also heard coaches say to avoid cross country, because it recruits slow-twitch muscle fibers which increase endurance but makes you SLOWER. From my personal experience, I would have to agree. I ran long-distance in track and did a year of cross-country. I went from being pretty explosive as a child to not very explosive as an adult from all of the long-distance training. I'm actually writing an article on this that should explain this in bit more detail and have some successful athletic development coaches, studies, and even track coaches backing the statement.

But who knows, it might not make a difference.

I like to use high-intensity basketball workouts to stay in basketball shape, but if you want a break from basketball, you could also set up a running schedule similar to this during the summer:

Week 1
Monday – 4 x 400 meter,
Thursday – 4 x 400 meter runs, 4 x 200 meter runs

Week 2
Monday – 6 x 400 meter runs
Thursday – 6 x 400 meter runs, 4 x 200 meter runs

Week 3
Monday – 12 x 200 meter runs
Thursday – 4 x 400 meter runs, 8 x 200 meter runs

Week 4
Monday – 16 x 200 meter runs
Thursday – 8 x 400 meter runs

Week 5
Monday – 6 x 400 meter runs, 6 x 200 meter runs
Thursday – 10 x 400 meter runs

As you get close to season, you can start doing more sport-specific conditiongiing with a workout like this:

- Shuttle Sprint – 30 seconds. Rest 30 seconds
- Lateral Movement (Slide or Crossover) Shuttle – 15 seconds. Rest 15 seconds

Run through 8 times.

_________________
Joe Haefner
http://www.breakthroughbasketball.com/kc/


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PostPosted: 13 Jan 2010, 16:53 
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Here is another thought... we had some players that would come in early and shoot 1,000 free throws a day... all summer. Those kids were automatic.... 90+ % during the season. This took care of the muscle memory and helped their regular shooting too.

I always told my players that if they were having problems with their shot... get to the free throw line where you can concentrate on your form... good free throw shooters with correct form can shoot with their eyes closed... seriously... Have a contest with someone... that way you can rebound and feed the shooter... once you get the stroke down... you will be surprised with the outcome..

During summer shooting camps we used to do this.. have a contest.. one of the varsity girls was in the finals often... I shot with them too... just to prove to the younger kids that it could be done.... Let me know how that works for you.


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PostPosted: 02 May 2016, 13:33 

Posts: 62
Good Luck, Samantha. Sounds like you are going to get a great workout with these tips.


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