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PostPosted: 05 Feb 2013, 21:22 

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Anyone have any good tips on how to get players to finish games and put them away? This has been our biggest flaw this year. We have been in every single game (except 2) entering the 4th Quarter by 5-8 points. However, we ALWAYS, yes always, seem to run out of steam and begin playing sloppy offense and lackadaisical defense. Throwing up crazy shots, not boxing out, not getting back on the breaks letting the other team build a margin of 20+ points. I should mention that my team is out-sized, out-talented, and out-manned each time we step on the court, but we are that scrappy team that just will not go away...

The thing is, we condition, daily. We do a lot of work to keep them in shape. Ay tips to help us put these games away and get our first win with ony three games to go?

Thanks!


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PostPosted: 05 Feb 2013, 22:48 

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Been there, many times. I know the feeling all too well. What happens to us is the other team seems to get a butt kicking from their coach, so after a time out or qtr break, they come out with a vengeance.

To keep the edge in a game I know we can win, I have to use every break or time out to remind them to keep their focus. Usually the other team starts to get desperate, so they will press, become overly aggressive and the refs seem to let them play.

Here's what I tell my kids in games like that. "The other team is out for blood, they want the ball and they want to score, anyway they can. They are going to pressure you. Expect it. They are in panic mode. We're going to protect the ball, play tough defense, and use their panic against them. They are going to get desperate, you keep the intensity up and they will make mistakes. You cannot let up on your intensity. Every loose ball is yours. Everyone. Every rebound is yours. They aren't going to give you this game, you have to earn it. You set the intensity level, not them." Over and over with each break. Some variation of that, depending upon what's going on out on the court.

Lots of praise when they're playing. Especially when they keep the intensity up and get loose balls or tie ups. Keep them pumped up out on the court.

On offense, depending upon the circumstances, I might slow it down and be patient. Looking for good solid drives to the basket type thing. Again, depends upon the tweak I need at the time.

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PostPosted: 06 Feb 2013, 08:19 
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Is it because the other team turns things up a notch and your guys have trouble taking care of the ball and playing at the faster speed?

If you can find a way to take care of the ball (no turnovers), rebound, and get the opponents to take tough shots in the 4th quarter... you should have a chance to win every game. Easier said than done, especially with just three games left.

One thing you can do is run situations (like Coach Sar likes to call them) and/or run short scrimmages in practice. When ever you scrimmage play to just three points (going by one) or put 2 minutes up on the clock. Play really short high intensity games. Work on taking care of the ball, buckling down on defense, and rebounding.

If players are familiar you can just tell them were running a 2 minute drill. Then maybe take a time out after 2 or 3 minutes. Give them a break and let them know it's another 2 minute drill, just like in practice. It's zero to zero. That might get them mentally focused to finish a game. Or first to 3 wins.

And like Coach Rob mentioned, find a way to get the ball inside. This is another situation to practice. Lay up only first 30 seconds, after that you can take a lay up or WIDE open jump shot. Situational basketball. Spread things out, maybe 5 out and try to get the ball inside or if you have good post guys, get it in the post.

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PostPosted: 06 Feb 2013, 11:34 
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OK Jeff -

You stole my thunder! Run SITUATIONS that mimic exactly what you are describing here.... thats #1...
#2- brak down your 4th quarter into 1 minute segments.... (got that from Rob Judson, I think he was at Illinois State U at the time) That way you can lose one of the segments and still come back.

Yes, remind them that the other team is going to come out with both barrels blazing... protect the ball, control the tempo and get good shots on every possesion.

You say that your team is in good shape, you work on conditioning daily..... do it with a ball.... fast break drills, full court shooting drills etc. Make up your own.

Here is my recipie for success -

1- Control the Tempo
2- Get a good shot every time down the floor
3- Play GREAT Defense and REBOUND
***** Most of the time the first shot wont hurt you, its the 2nd,3rd and 4th putback that will cost you the game*****
4- Protect the ball.... NO turnovers
5- EVERY loose ball is ours.
5- Take a CHARGE every time they drive the lane

I hope this helps and have given you something that Jeff & Rob haven't ( some are repeats I am sure )


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PostPosted: 06 Feb 2013, 12:25 

Posts: 21
Looking forward to practicing today. When the problem first began, I was running a Two-Minute Drill at the end of practice (when they were tired) where they would have 3 segments of two minutes (equals our 6 minute quarters) and they began the drill down by 10 points. Their goal is to be even or up by the end of the 2nd segment. This was done full court so the "Up-team" could press and get fast breaks to create a real game simulation. I also do a number of other drills to get them
Chasing loose balls, boxing out, and rebounding that we do with great intensity during practice, but lack in game.

Thanks for the suggestions!!


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PostPosted: 06 Feb 2013, 12:31 
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Let us know how it goes and what you did to change things.


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PostPosted: 07 Feb 2013, 22:33 

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So the saaaame exact thing happened again tonight except this time we got down by 18 in a hurry and clawed our way to within 6 at the end of the 3rd. We came out with high intensity defense but gave up 3 QUICK 3's on 3 quick turnovers. That sucked every bit of momentum we had out and with 2:22 left they had a 22 point margin (weird, huh?). I called a full timeout and put my last 5 guys in to finish the game.

New question. When I put those five guys in, the parents didn't seem too thrilled. I got some very nasty looks and huffs and puffs when we emerged from the locker room. Clearly the game was out of reach and it's time I start giving some younger kids "molding time" for next season. How do I convey this to parents? They look at me as if I am giving up on a game and that I shouldn't give those guys a chance when the other team has gone deep in their bench well before.


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PostPosted: 08 Feb 2013, 00:51 

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Coach Britt wrote:
So the saaaame exact thing happened again tonight except this time we got down by 18 in a hurry
Getting down 18 in a hurry is where I'd focus my attention. In my case, it's usually a full court press + turnovers that get us in trouble early. Whatever the case, if I'm down by 3 baskets early on, I call time out and we talk. If I notice a press right out of the gate, I immediately call time out and we talk about our press break real quick. I've found that controlling potential problems early on helps, clawing your way back is difficult.

Quote:
New question. When I put those five guys in, the parents didn't seem too thrilled. I got some very nasty looks and huffs and puffs when we emerged from the locker room. Clearly the game was out of reach and it's time I start giving some younger kids "molding time" for next season. How do I convey this to parents? They look at me as if I am giving up on a game and that I shouldn't give those guys a chance when the other team has gone deep in their bench well before.
These potential issues are better dealt with early on (preseason) with a clear explanation of your coaching philosophy and expectations of players and parents. Honestly? You're not required to give an explanation for your decisions on the court to the parents, imo. You could send out a quick e-mail if you felt the need to clarify. It's a slippery slope when you start feeling the need to "qualify" your decisions as a coach to the parents.

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PostPosted: 08 Feb 2013, 04:45 

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Coach Rob, I used a 30 second after we were down 8 and a full when it hit 15. We set up a press breaker and started slowly clawing our way back in once we beat the press and half court trap. We finally settled down and started taking and making smart shots and smart passes. Our biggest problem was making stupid little mistakes (3, 5, 10 Sec Violations, carrying, traveling) which we usually never make...

You're right, clawing back into a game is not fun, but we seem to have figured out how to do that. So far this year, we have had slow starts, strong 2nds, very good 3rds, non existent 4ths or Awesome 1, 2, and 3 quarters with non existent 4ths.

I made it VERY clear that my decisions of the team should be respected. I had to emphasize this point, because I did not have an assistant at that point (came in on our 3rd game). I know as a coach there are always people who disagree with everything you do, but this seems like all of the parents of those who START. They feel like they should be given the "chance" to finish, even though the game is way out of hand...

Hopefully we can put a full game together next week.


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PostPosted: 08 Feb 2013, 06:52 
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Coach Britt - Do you keep stats? I know it can be hard as a youth coach but with our high school team we track detailed stats to motivate our players, get them playing the right way, and make sure we are focusing on the right things.

By looking at the right stats you can determine the biggest problem and what you should be focusing on. Are turnovers your biggest problem? Is is poor rebounding? What's your offensive and defensive reb %? Is it your defense? What's your opponents EFG% and/or PPP? Is your opponent making a living at the free throw line? Is it your offense the problem? What's your offensses EFG% and/or PPP?

If I'm losing or winning a game, I want to know exactly why. This allows us to focus on the critical few, versus the trivial many. I have some stat templates I can send you that allow you to pinpoint the biggest thing that needs fixed. Just let me know if you want me to send them.

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