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PostPosted: 30 Dec 2017, 15:20 

Posts: 4
My question is about extending the Match-up Zone to 3/4 court.

As context, this is my first year implementing Don Kelbick's Match-up Zone in a boys varsity team. I have been pleased with the results to date—when we play it well, that is, refuse to give up lay-ups, we have held much superior scoring teams to low scores.

I want to extend our defense to the 3/4 court for two reasons: a) we play FIBA rules, which involves a 24-second shot clock, and b) I want to constantly scrimmage against quality back-court pressure so that our team develop confidence doing so.

However, though we're still in the very early days of implementing 3/4 court pressure, I must admit to some confusion. Specifically, when extending to 3/4 court, does the rule of "having to guard someone" still apply? Or does it look more like a 2-2-1 zone press, albeit using Match-Up Zone rules, which then seamlessly recovers in the half-court to a true Match-Up Zone in which everyone must guard someone? My players challenged me on this, and I confessed to being unsure.

I'm looking for some further education here: does each defender still find a check? if so, why, and how does pressure evolve from this? if not, why, and what does recovery look like?

Very best wishes,

Graham Lettner
Black Diamond, AB


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PostPosted: 02 Jan 2018, 17:12 
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Posts: 180
Location: Miami, Fl.
Graham

The rule still applies, just like in any defense. However, I think you are getting confused by terminology. Every defender must be responsible for an offensive player. Does that mean you are denying the ball, forcing back door, etc.? No. Does that mean you can't trap, play a passing lane, etc.? No. I means that when a particular player gets the ball, who is responsible as the primary defender? Just like the half court defense.

How you want your defender to carry out that responsibility is up to you. Can you deny them Sure. What the defense looks like depends on how you want to defend and what their offense looks like. Can it look like a 2-2-1? Yes. Can it look like a 1-2-1-1? Yes. It depends on how they play and how you want to defend.

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http://www.DonKelbickBasketball.com
http://www.BreakthroughBasketball.com


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PostPosted: 08 Jan 2018, 11:59 

Posts: 4
Hi Don,

Your reply is much appreciated. I think I intellectually understand everything you've written; being new to the on-court implementation, I probably got tripped up by over-thinking things.

Also, as I believe everyone, not just players, are helped by positive feedback, you should know that a number of your materials (match-up defense, motion offense, and transition break) have made a marked improvement in my coaching—that is, I've become more simplified, less prone to over-coach, more able to spot the fundamentals of what the players need to learn. Very high quality materials and our team is much better for them; thank you.

Graham


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PostPosted: 09 Jan 2018, 09:40 
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Posts: 180
Location: Miami, Fl.
I believe that basketball, at all levels (and I have coached at all levels) is really a simple game. As coaches, we often work overtime to complicate it.

I am happy to help and am glad that you find the materials good for you. If I can help you in any way, just let me know.

Good luck with your team.

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Don Kelbick
http://www.DonKelbickBasketball.com
http://www.BreakthroughBasketball.com


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