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PostPosted: 13 Dec 2010, 16:28 

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2nd game of our season (7/8th Grade Rec) and we're 2-0. I'm using the Open Post offense (bought the Lason Perkins DVD) this year and it has been fun for the kids (and me to watch). Highly recommend for youth teams!
One issue, that's really always an issue in youth bball, I find are kids immediately putting the ball on the floor after receiving the pass. I constantly teach and remind them to go triple threat, look toward the basket for a pass, and pivot as needed. Then if you need to dribble to open a lane, attack the basket, or avoid 5 sec count fine. Very frustrating at times. I think it's a developmental issue more than anything.

If you have any thoughts I'll take them.

Steve


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PostPosted: 13 Dec 2010, 16:50 
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We ran an Open Post Offense with our Varsity team........ and our kids handled this very well...... many times we put 6 or 7 defenders on the floor to teach them patience and protecting the ball.

We used to play a little NO dribble game... try that in one of your practices - it forces them to catch and triple threat... protect the ball and look for the open man... it also teaches the other players to work to get open... back door, cut and replace etc.

Emphasize not turning the ball over, take the 5 second count first.


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PostPosted: 14 Dec 2010, 08:25 
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Steve, I think you're right. That is a problem for this age group. I'm working with a 7th grade "competitive" team. They have the same issue. I have done a few things to work on this and they are SLOWLY getting better.

1. As Coach Sar mentioned, we run 3v3 or 4v4 with no dribble. And every time they catch the ball, they must turn and face. I actually ran this drill recently to work on my players being tougher with the ball: http://www.breakthroughbasketball.com/playcreator/view.asp?id=139&type=drill. They had a problem when pressure comes at them that they cradle the ball or put it above their head while leaning backwards.

2. I continue with 3v3 or 4v4 and after a little bit, I give them a 2 dribble limit. They can not take more than 2 dribbles.

I got this from Don Kelbick. Every time they dribble, their intent must be lay up. No dribbling to dribble. Otherwise, it is an automatic turnover.

By the way, this will look very ugly at first, but they will come along.

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PostPosted: 14 Dec 2010, 08:34 
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We used to run what we called the "MAN MAKER" drill to toughen our players up and teach them how to protect the ball and move it where we wanted it.

It was also a NO dribble drill.... After you run this a few times you will understand why we called it Man Maker.

- 3 offensive players on the end line'
- 2 defensive players at the free throw line extended (one with the ball and he passes it to the 0 player in the middle)

The offense must move the ball past half court WITHOUT dribbling.... they also HAVE to STAY in their lanes. (court is divided in thirds)

They can cut and replace - they can jab and move, they can try to freeze the defender - pretty much anything goes within the rules of the game.
The player with the ball has to protect it, triple threat, move the ball, pass fake etc. Anything that he can do to make that pass WITHOUT throwing the ball away. There is NO time limit.

One of the things that we always talked about to our players was NO TURNOVERS (if possible) do NOT throw the ball away, take the 5 or 10 second call, we can ply defense if they take the ball out of bounds - we cant defend breakaway layups. Try this out guys and let me know how it goes.


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PostPosted: 14 Dec 2010, 15:19 

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Thanks for the tips! No dribble when running the offense will be a POE at practice. I like both drills and will use them at my practice tomorrow. Coach Sars will actually also help with the press we will most likely face next game (I don't agree, but it is allowed at this level).

Pivoting is one fundamental that I think does not get enough air time with youth. Was at a gr3/4 boys game my son was reffing Sunday and felt so bad for one team that just had not been very well coached about pivoting. Mostly stood frozen while the opposition tied up or stole the ball. At one point a player had the ball near where I was and I couldn't help myself so I tell him "pivot". It was like a light bulb turned on; he pivots and suddenly gains control of the situation, defense is overplaying, puts it on the floor and goes in for a layup. At all youth levels I think this needs more focus.

Thanks again,
Steve


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PostPosted: 14 Dec 2010, 15:32 
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Let us know how it goes.


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PostPosted: 15 Dec 2010, 19:40 
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Location: Miami, Fl.
How often do you practice?

If you can have multiple practices, why not go the whole mile. Take the air out of the ball. We would often practice with a dead ball, just enough air to make sure it comes up on a bounce pass.

Add to the limitations such as, layup only, jumpers off screens only, back door cuts only (not all at the same time, of course).

If you have enough practice days, so you can transfer this work into actual game like work, you can make real progress, quickly (helps with screening and cutting, too)

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PostPosted: 15 Dec 2010, 19:54 
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3rd and 4th graders not pivoting is more a function of their lack of experience and inability to process all the things thrown at them at this stage of their development.

Being on the outside, having your cognitive skills refined and having more life experience, the game is much slower for you. But, to those kids, the game move at 3 times the speed of light.

One of the things you learn as a coach is not to make value judgements on other coaches and what other kids are being taught. Remember, others are doing the same to you and you think you are doing a pretty good job. What you see, especially at this age, is rarely a reflection of what is being covered in their world.

You might be right about pivoting, but being only 9 and 10 years old, they haven't had much time to learn anything, no less develop the recognition and discrimination skills that they need to determine what skills they need to best take advantage of particular situations. Especially when those situations are coming at Warp 10. The fact that the kid was able to perform a pivot when you focused him on it means, at some point, he must have been taught.

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PostPosted: 16 Dec 2010, 16:24 

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True words Don. My perspective comes from being in those 3/4 grade coaches shoes a short while back and not having a clue what best to focus on. My comment about the coaching was an opinion based on what I observed and concluded thru my past experiences. Of course I could be wrong, and I shouldn’t blame the volunteer coaches who are doing their best, so sorry coaches. More than anything it is probably me reflecting back on my own failings.
Being our boy’s coordinator and responsible for getting our coaches trained, I was happy our town did execute (and pivot) well. When it got to 20-0 I just felt bad for the opposing town’s kids and blamed their current coaching, when many factors I’m sure were involved.

My practice went well (only have 1 per week, it is rec ball), used the Ball Tough and Man Maker. Both I think will help. We’ll see how they execute this Saturday. Going to be very tough as it looks like I’ll only have 5 players (3 are away), yikes!


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PostPosted: 18 Dec 2010, 19:18 

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Well we lost, our first of the season, but played well. They were up 2 at half time then the fatigue really set in only having 5 players.
They pressed anytime they could (league allows press up to 10pt margin), we broke it fairly effectively, but it definitely wears on the players. Then, they were always overly aggressive in the halfcourt, which makes it difficult to set up the 5 out offense. In these situations I tell them to just basket cut, space, and attack the basket when possible. Worked very well for some easy buckets, as my guys were simply behind their defense. There were a few times they packet it in a little more and we ran our offense very effectively, I really like 5 out motion. In the end it was a size disadvantage for us as 2 of my missing players were 2/3rds of my size. They were able to simply put back many of their misses with no effective contest. Would’ve definitely been a different outcome, in my opinion, if I had my whole team. Maybe we’ll see them in the playoffs!

Take care all,
Steve


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