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PostPosted: 30 Dec 2010, 13:44 

Posts: 14
Coaches what would you do if you have a player who has above average ball handling skills, taller than most, but doesn't seem able to create off the dribble? His triple threat game is great, but off the dribble he looks robotic and doesn't know what move to use againts a defender.

What's a great way of making him more unguardable off the dribble?


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PostPosted: 30 Dec 2010, 15:26 
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I'll email you a copy of a short ebook I wrote for some local players I work with. I think it will give you some ideas. I'll send it right now. Let me know if it doesn't go through and also what you think of the ebook.

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PostPosted: 30 Dec 2010, 21:28 
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Creating your own shot really comes down to 3 things.

1 - Confidence: Does he feel (not you) he is comfortable enough with the ball to be able to create a shot?

2 - Knowledge: Does he know how to create his shot? It does not involve taking a hundred dribbles in 32 different directions to take a shot. I have a phrase that I use when I work with players, "If you can't beat him in 2 dribbles, you can't beat him." It is usually a short burst that gets you open.

2 - Perception: This is the toughest thing. Can he see when he has a shot? Some of this is experience, some is innate. Some players, no matter how skilled they are, no matter how hard they work, will never create their own shot. They just don't possess the ability to see where shots come from.

How old is this kid? He just may not have enough experience. Things come in their own time and, if he is a youngin', he may grow into it.

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PostPosted: 30 Dec 2010, 22:17 

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Coach kelbick can you tell me more about perception? He is 15 and is a sophomore who plays junior varsity/varsity. He has good basketball IQ, but he is too unselfish and never looks for his shot, until he hits one and that's when he starts to look for points.

Also when he scores he doesn't use ball handling to create space like a chris Paul, or use speed and quickness like a john wall or derrick rose, he just gets the ball and goes to the rim in straight lines, which is effective Some of the time.


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PostPosted: 31 Dec 2010, 12:01 
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I don't understand. He is 15 years old and doesn't create space like Chris Paul? Maybe he should be a musician instead of a basketball player. I think anyone who is 15 and doesn't play like Chris Paul should give up the game.

Or, you should be more realistic of his abilities at 15 years old.

Perception is defined as "the process of using the senses to acquire information about the surrounding environment or situation." It is one of the factors that allows us to make decisions. It is also largely an unconscious activity that is cultivated by experience

To put it in an everyday task terms, take driving a car as an example. You have years of experience behind the wheel. You are driving down a busy highway and decide to change lanes. In a flash, without even thinking, you evaluate speed, space, position of other vehicles, how much to turn the wheel, how fast to go, etc. and make the change. Your decision to change is largely shaped buy the perceptions you developed over time. Taking all that into account, and you decided to go. Someone who has been driving for only a week might not do the same thing because he just doesn't have the same experience as you do.

You can't see or interpret what he sees. You might not understand why he does not change lanes when there is, what you perceive, to be an opportunity to do so. He does not see the same thing you do because his perceptions are differnt than yours.

In addition, the speed in which you are able to process the information you gain from your perceptions is innate. Some people process information faster than others. There is nothing you can do to speed it up. It is a neuro-physiological issue that is contained in your genentic programming. Your processing will improve with experience, but only marginally. It is like other things in your body, such as weight control, balding, proclivity to deseases, intelligence, etc., 80%-90% is genetically programmed. Everything we do with health control is to try to control the other 10%-20%.

Chris Paul has really worked, for years and years, to become a great player, but his physical potential is greater than most. You put the two together you get a great player. Steve Nash innately see the floor and processes information better than most. It has to be. Otherwise, everyone would be able to pass like he does.

There is no one on Earth that practiced as much as I did when I was a player. I was a jump shooter. I worked on everything, to exhaustion. No matter how hard I worked, I was never able to develop the instincts to put the ball on the floor and go to the basket. I could get off a jumpshot in a flash, but I had to give conscious thought to trying to get to the basket and you cannot play like that. It just wasn't going to happen that way for me.

He is only 15 years old. You say he is a good player. But, he is a JV player. I know 15-year olds I can project as pros right now. There are reasons he is a JV player. His game has not developed to a higher level -- YET. Maybe you should stop comparing him to Chris Paul and start evaluating him as the player he is. If he is a good player, he must have developed somewhere. Give him things to work on and let him develop (let him, you can't make him). Evaluate his improvement, not as an end product.

Either that or encourage all 15-year olds who can't do what Chris Paul can do to play soccer instead.

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PostPosted: 31 Dec 2010, 15:50 

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I mean he doesn't use his ball handling ability to break down the defense like chris Paul does. He is not a crossover dribbler basically. Thanks for explaining perception to me!


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PostPosted: 31 Dec 2010, 16:10 
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Don has made some great points here.... and the kid is 15 years old - he plays on my sophomore team where I coached - so being JV is not a bad thing... he has gotten that far.

I had kids that were freshman B players make it to varsity and become all conference players.... let him grow and mature as a person and player. Who know what will happen. One kid I had was a non player as a freshman B player.... ended up as one of the best 3 point shooters and point guards I ever had... so be patient with him and relax your expectations.

This is his second year as a high school player, he has a long way to go. He can go to camps in and out of school and work on his game in the off season. Seems like all he needs is a little self conficence and who knows what will happen.


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PostPosted: 31 Dec 2010, 17:08 
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I am sure he doesn't to anything Chris Paul does. He's 15. Very few people do what Chris Paul does.

If he's been taught, let him work on it. If he hasn't been taught, teach him, and then leave him alone to practice.

If you push him do do things he can't, he will lose confidence and give up the game. If he is a player, he'll figure it out.

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PostPosted: 06 Jan 2011, 03:32 

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addressed to jordankelly1895 please reply to this email slystyle1@hotmail.com. ask for JC. i specialize in on ball shot creation development. what mr. kelbick stated was true but it is far more in depth than that. in actuality from personal experience from analysis the skills for a player to create their own shot is often undertaught and too limited. i have only found 1 video on youtube that has any ample explanation and it was on for 1 move. break their core(base defensive stance) and you can create a shot or a driving lane in most situations in less than 4 seconds(beginners).


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