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PostPosted: 06 Aug 2010, 11:27 

Posts: 1
#1 --great web site and resource ... This is the best one I have seen and refer to often -- I spread the word about this site and tell all my coaches ( I am commisioner for our youth league) to refere to it
#2- any good articles / notes on coaching your own son?? (there has to be !!!)... I coach a youth travel team (5g boys) in a very competitive town... any tips for coaching your own son would be appreciated..
Keep up the good work

Thanks,


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PostPosted: 06 Aug 2010, 13:28 
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Posts: 3106
I think that some parents have a tendency to be too hard on their own kids.... (not all) try to treat them just like you would any other kid.... make that separation. Its hard enough for the kid as some will say that the parent is playing favorites - its the nature of the beast.

These are 5th graders and the goal for players of this age is to teach them the fundamentals and preparing them to play at the next level ........ winning should be a by product of a fundamentally sound team. Ask the high school varsity coach what he would like you to teach.

Teach them how to play m2m Defense, stay away from zones. As a varsity coach we didn't allow our feeder teams to play ANY ZONE D.

After the games, don't bring up basketball unless your son starts the conversation.... try to keep it positive. You can write down the things that need to be corrected and put that into your practice plan for the next day. Don't let the sun set on bad feelings about the game.


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PostPosted: 06 Aug 2010, 17:47 
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Posts: 617
Darrell,

I seem to remember some advice about coaching your own son but I can't seem to find it right now. If I can remember where I saw that I'll let you know.

From my perspective, I think you just need to be a good coach. That might sound stupid but I think it's true. Study coaching, motivation, fundamentals, etc, and I think you'll be in good shape.

I do often hear other coaches say they treat their kids just like other players. And they even tell them, when we're on the court, I'm coach and I need to treat you just like any other player. When we're at home or off the court, you're my son and I'll do anything for you. I'm not sure how that worked out for them, but I have heard that type of thing more than once.

So back to being a good coach. I think if you make practice fun, you teach fundamentals, you don't worry about winning, you try to develop all the players for the future, you study the game, you set a good example, you are prepared, and you are organized -- then I think you'll be coaching your own son effectively.

I think that the really good coaches have things under control so well, that you don't even realize their son is on the team. I know this is easier said than done. But studying the good coaches will help.

I think if you follow the advice in the motivation report, it will go a long ways:
http://www.breakthroughbasketball.com/mental/motivate-players.html

I think good coaches also do many of the things in this report (parent meetings, handbooks, parent letters, and clear rules):
http://www.breakthroughbasketball.com/coaching/dealing-with-parents.html

I also recommend you watch Stan Van Gundy's short video on this page. In the video, he mentions something that I see LOTS of parents do with their kids.
http://www.youtube.com/user/BreakthroughBBall#grid/user/2F99412DF9F68C97

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Jeff Haefner
http://www.BreakthroughBasketball.com


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PostPosted: 06 Aug 2010, 17:49 
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Posts: 617
Here's another good link for you to check out:
http://www.breakthroughbasketball.com/blog/index.php/8-secrets-to-sucess-how-they-relate-to-youth-coaching-parenting/

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Jeff Haefner
http://www.BreakthroughBasketball.com


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PostPosted: 09 Aug 2010, 12:31 
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Posts: 191
Location: New Britain, CT.
Darrell,

I coached my son throughout travel and I guess my only recommendation would be to treat him like all other players. Equal praiseand criticism for all players.
I can be, at times, tougher on both my son and daughter when it comes to basketball. But i've seen coaches rip into their own flesh and blood during games and practices..leaving the kid totally embarrassed.
On the flip side, I've seen coaches show favortism toward their son/daughter and this can reflect negatively on the entire team and other parents. These coaches would play their kids 90% of the game and never admonish them for poor play or lazy defense.
Prior to the first practice, sit down with your son and go over objectives, goals, conduct, attitude, what you expect out of him etc.

Good Luck!!

Coach A


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