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PostPosted: 15 Oct 2013, 12:40 

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If I could get some advice on what a motion against a zone looks like that would be awesome.


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PostPosted: 15 Oct 2013, 17:13 

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The most common zone I run into is a 2-3. We run a 1-3-1 offensive set against 2-3 zones, but it's not really a "motion offense". My corner guy runs short corner to short corner vs all the way out. Sometimes that player will run ball-side, sometimes they are on the weak side, up to them. We want to the ball going into the post, post looks for shot first, player running short corner second, and third is weak side wing who should be cheating in a bit.

Found this animation that shows a version of the 1-3-1
http://www.jes-basketball.com/animated/poffensezone1-3-1vs2-3and2-1-2zone.html

Another one
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QfL92HwsW8k

Maybe someone else will chime in about using a motion offense against a zone. I've always tried to move the zone and get the ball inside. Once the ball is inside, good things usually happen.

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PostPosted: 16 Oct 2013, 05:10 
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Rob,

Thats what we ran vs the 2-3 / 2-1-2 We had a lot of success running the 1-3-1 offense but of course the keys are, you need some good perimeter shooters and its always nice to have someone in the post that can so some damage for you. I always liked to get the ball inside before we starting jacking up 3 balls, doing that weakens the zone. The player that we had working the short corners set up behind the zone, that forces the D to turn their head away from the ball, advantage you.


We talked a lot about getting into passing lanes.... make yourself available to the person with the ball.

I always say this to coaches - something I got from a college coach - " This isn't rocket science, put em where they aint. " That's exactly how he put it to me.


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PostPosted: 17 Oct 2013, 06:47 
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We run free form motion against man to man. Then make the adjustments below to our motion when facing zone. Also, it's not mentioned below, but we emphasize less screening/player movement and more pass fakes and ball movement when facing zone.


When we face zone defense, we will continue running motion. Spacing, looking inside, ball reversals, catching and facing the basket, and all our core motion offense rules are still very important and applicable to the zone. However we'll make a few small adjustments...

Alignment

We will change our alignment when facing a zone. We'll go to a 3 out 2 in formation. The 3 perimeter players will work together and the 2 inside players will work together.

Perimeter Players

Pass and cut. Look for an opening. Look for cuts to the corner and then look inside.

Low Post Player

This player can be in the short corner (butt to the baseline), in the low post, or flashing to an open area.

When on the low block and the ball is reversed, stay on the weakside and wait for the ball to come to you. You will be open for the seal on the reversal.

When the ball goes to short corner, look for middle post player diving to the basket.

Middle Player

This player can be at the free throw line, high post (elbow), flashing to an open area, or mid post. Maintain spacing and be aware of the low post player.

Dive when the ball goes to short corner.

Seal for position and use your body to box out and create big gaps in the zone.

As always, crash the offensive boards and anticipate the shot.

Pass Fakes

Use PASS FAKES against the zone. This will get the defense out of position. Use fake skip passes and so on. Be decisive in your cuts (cut hard), maintain spacing, and get ball reversals.

1-3-1 Zone Adjustment

When needed, we will change to our press breaker formation. All rules still apply. Just run your press breaker which follows motion offense rules and spacing.

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PostPosted: 17 Oct 2013, 06:48 
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BTW, I have found that since we run a free form motion and spend lots of time on fundamentals (driving, passing, shooting, finishing, etc)... we can just put our offensive players in gaps, tell them to focus more on pass fakes/ball movement, and "let them play".

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PostPosted: 17 Oct 2013, 07:23 
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Good stuff Jeff..... the wheel has already been built. We pretty much did all of those tihngs..... I might add this.... when reversing the ball - sometimes fake the reversal and go back to the original passer. If you think about this.... if you are reversing, the D is constantly moving in one direction - IF you fake the reversal and go back, the D has and
go back to their original spot.... doesn't seem like much, but any edge you can give yourself is a plus. JMO


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PostPosted: 17 Oct 2013, 08:31 

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Thank you everyone very much. Especially Jeff. I think keeping the free style offense is what I'm looking for. Implementing it against a zone is a little more difficult, this gives me some ideas on where to go from here. I didn't want to default back to set plays.. This is my first year as head coach so anymore advice would be warmly welcomed. (especially in the implementation of the zone motion offense.)


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PostPosted: 17 Oct 2013, 09:02 
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Its still pretty simple.... put them in the gaps..... "put en where they aint" I ran an open post offense vs m2m but it didn't work as well vs zones.... maybe I didn't work on it enough vs zones...... we could tear up m2m defenses. Teams hated playing against us.

Good luck, I hope this works out for you.


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PostPosted: 18 Oct 2013, 12:26 

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Coach Sar wrote:
Rob,

Thats what we ran vs the 2-3 / 2-1-2 We had a lot of success running the 1-3-1 offense but of course the keys are, you need some good perimeter shooters and its always nice to have someone in the post that can so some damage for you. I always liked to get the ball inside before we starting jacking up 3 balls, doing that weakens the zone. The player that we had working the short corners set up behind the zone, that forces the D to turn their head away from the ball, advantage you.

We talked a lot about getting into passing lanes.... make yourself available to the person with the ball.

I always say this to coaches - something I got from a college coach - " This isn't rocket science, put em where they aint. " That's exactly how he put it to me.
Pretty much sums it up. I think it was Tom Izzo who said, "Once you get the ball in the paint, good things happen".

clverser - best advice I can give you is no matter what offensive set you choose, emphasize the fundamentals. Setting good screens, waiting for the screen, setting up the screen, sprinting your cuts, setting up your cuts, quick sharp passes, meeting the ball when receiving a pass, etc. It's frustrating to practice an offense only to see it deteriorate in a game due to sloppy fundamentals.

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