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PostPosted: 06 May 2014, 12:09 

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Jeff, would it be possible to see some info on your free form motion?


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PostPosted: 06 May 2014, 12:38 
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Yep. I just sent you an email. I did not attach the rules I use because I'm going to redo them. I had made some changes mentally but never put those thoughts on paper.

I made the mistake of having a few too many rules this past season and then once I scaled back that helped a lot. And I remembered why I originally started with so few rules to begin with. Just let me know and I can try to write them up for you.

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PostPosted: 07 May 2014, 08:07 

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I guess this kind of resembles what I did with my 4th grade girls travel team this season.

We started in a 4out and the focus was on dribble drive action, with the drive side corner rotating up. Our only other main rule was if you pass, you cut. Plain and simple. We eventually changed this into a 5 out that began with down screens to help us make the initial pass to the wing and get our passing and cutting started. Our biggest focus areas were to keep spacing, pas and cut, maybe set some ball screens and to cut backdoor if your defender was above the 3 point line.

Eventually we put in a couple of set plays that were simple to execute. We had a horns set where we allowed our PG to choose a side and use the pick and roll. And we put in a call for our best post player where after she set the down screen, we passed to that wing and then the wing looked to throw the ball into the post. These both worked pretty well for us.

Jeff, do you include the Laker in your teachings when you go 4out? I read a lot about that has part of the read and react. From my readings, the read and react can be pretty flexible in what you install also. The base layer is pass and cut and everything builds off that.

I'm finding that I tend to take bits and pieces of various offensive systems and build them into my own system. Sort of a hybrid. I think my defense was built this way too and I might start a new thread discussing that to get some thoughts.


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PostPosted: 07 May 2014, 11:52 
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Quote:
Jeff, do you include the Laker in your teachings when you go 4out? I read a lot about that has part of the read and react. From my readings, the read and react can be pretty flexible in what you install also. The base layer is pass and cut and everything builds off that.


What's "the Laker"? I'm not sure what you mean.

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PostPosted: 07 May 2014, 13:11 

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Sorry, that should say "Laker CUT".

Pass and cut on a post entry.


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PostPosted: 09 May 2014, 08:33 
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Ok. Got it. I used to get specific about what players do when the ball goes in the post and how to handle different situations like that. But I have moved away from that and simplified. The less to think about in a game and the less time spent memorizing what to do in practice, the better.

I found when I got too technical about those things and had too many rules, our decision making in games and time for skill development in practice went down hill.

So I do show them laker cuts, how to relocate, and maybe even screen away when the ball goes in the post. But I don't really care what they do as long as they move and maintain spacing. Some players might laker cut every time. Other guys might relocate. I might even put a bug in our best shooters ear to relocate more often that not. But as long as they have spacing and move, I don't really care what they do.

Not to say we won't practice laker cuts or handling those situations. But I try to allow players to make their own decisions. All they really need to remember is keep spacing and don't stand for more than 2 seconds (move).

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PostPosted: 09 May 2014, 08:55 

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I realize I probably hijacked this thread, so I apologize to the original poster.

With that said, Jeff it sounds like I might actually be incorporating your type of philosophy into my team. The first thing we always talk about is pass and cut. I feel like this forces movement. When we do shell drill, it's always pass and cut with the accompanying movements to fill spots. We did this so much that I do think it became natural instinct to them.

My big thing next season is going to be spacing with pass and cut as our primary principle. We'll go over situations like back-cutting when your defender plays you too high and back-cutting when you're dribbled at and Laker cutting (which to me is still just pass and cut). I'd also like to add in a ballscreen series where everything is screen for the ballhandler. Even if we get stopped a few times, I really think if we continued to ballscreen for an entire possession eventually either the drive or the roller is going to be open. Some girls might even get designated to pick and pop instead of roll. We've got a couple good shooters.

Basic stuff that will allow for a ton of time to build a very solid skill base for the girls.


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PostPosted: 02 Jun 2014, 08:05 

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I used the R&R with 8th graders last season. It is a great way to teach offense. Not only half court offense, but every almost aspect of offense, we used R&R principles for press break, half court trap and in our fast break.

This may sound obvious and simple, but if you teach a whole team to look for a give and go (layer 1 of R&R) every time they pass or catch the ball, no matter the situation, half court offense, press break, fast break etc, it's amazing how many opportunities that opens up for them.

I see the R&R as a basketball IQ accelerator. Players learn to move effectively and keep good spacing without the ball by reading the ball, in all aspects of the game when they learn the R&R.

You can work in ball screens, back screens, pin screens, introduce quick hitters and more. I think the R&R gets a bad rap from some because they just see the 5 out, pass and cut part of it and if not coached well, that can turn a team into pass and cut robots, but the R&R is much, much more adaptable than that.

If you treat it like another play, it doesn't work, you train players to react, if they're thinking about every move, it doesn't work well. There is also a big psychological element to it. If players are afraid to make mistakes or not used to hitting cutters on the move, they must overcome those things first or the R&R will not be successful.

R&R is a great way to teach players how to play offense. If that's what you want, it's great. If you're looking for a set play to put in along with other set plays, it's not for you.


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PostPosted: 16 Oct 2014, 12:29 

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Hi Jeff,

I recently purchased the motion offense. Can you also send me you're write-up that you emailed previous posts on? Thx.

Kel


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PostPosted: 16 Oct 2014, 13:50 
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Yep. I just sent it to you. If you're looking for something else, let me know.

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