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PostPosted: 19 Feb 2012, 08:36 

Posts: 36
We have 3 decent post players that during practice can make layups all day long from the left or right side either during practice - drills, scrimmaging in transition or posting up. But when we get in a game during tournaments I can't believe how many little bunny layups we can't make when they are in the low post. Of course the difference is they are playing against another team with players that are the same size/ bigger and are just as athletic.

What can I do as a coach as far as drills or practice to increase the number of shots made during a game?

Thanks


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PostPosted: 19 Feb 2012, 13:27 
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You might try and get one of those football blocking pads - the ones you hold and bump them around until they get used to contact.... you can increase the contact to make it a little tougher until they get used to it and can stay focused during games.

Just encourage them to be more aggressive and stay focused around the basket.


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PostPosted: 20 Mar 2012, 19:44 

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I ran into the same problem this past year. One thing I did in practice is allow the kids to be physical with each other during practice with regards to fouls. Not to a point where players were getting hurt, but to a point that a coach or parent would probably be screaming at the ref "FOUL!". More times than not, refs seem to let the kids play these days, so teaching them not to look for the ref or coach to rescue them is something we drilled in our kids.

A drill we did that improved our layups was from half court. I had one line off to the left close to the sideline up near half court and the other line started at the half court jump circle. On my count of one, the jump circle player would dribble hard to make a layup, on my count of two, the player in the left line caught up to defend. The count was just enough to give the dribbler a slight head start, not much. Our first teaching point was that you've crossed your defender's face, you should be able to make the lay-up at this point. Our second teaching point was that you better lean into the defender as you make the lay-up. They must make contact, not avoid it.

As your name implies, we rewarded the kids who made the "And 1's".

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PostPosted: 21 Mar 2012, 06:16 
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Do mikan drills, figure 8 jump hooks, etc to develop and improve the basic skills. Then look at the situations where the players aren't finishing. Create 1on1 competitive drills that simulate those situations. Rob gave you a good idea for a competitive drill. I like 1on1 competitive situations because players get lots of reps. How many reps do players get in a physical 5on5 scrimmage?

All coaches practice lay up lines and things like that. But how often do you take a lay up directly from the wing, get two uncontested dribbles, and then lay it up with nobody contesting the shot? That almost never happens in a game. Almost all lay ups are contested, rushed, bumped, etc. So in practice we make a large portion of our lay ups and inside shots competitive and coming from different angles. Here are just a couple examples:
http://www.breakthroughbasketball.com/drills/finishing-drill-weakside.html
http://www.breakthroughbasketball.com/drills/Competitive-Chair-Rip.html
http://www.breakthroughbasketball.com/drills/2-competitive-drills-wing.html

Players love the competitive drills, and with time they get really confident and skilled at finishing in games. It doesn't happen overnight, but it does work.

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http://www.BreakthroughBasketball.com


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PostPosted: 05 Apr 2012, 10:11 

Posts: 41
I have been using MMA pads this season to bump, prod and thwack (sounds worse than it is) my guys inside the paint and it has made a load of difference. Not only do they finish better in traffic, they are less afraid of contact and are less likely to fade away from the basket when their shot is contested. They still miss some open layups and nerves still come into play there, but that is part of the game at all levels (unfortunately to all coaches' chagrin!).


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PostPosted: 05 Apr 2012, 10:25 
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Great move coach - we did that with our varsity teams and I have seen several middle school teams do that. Its just a matter of getting them used to contact at a young age.

We used football blocking pads.


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