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PostPosted: 03 May 2015, 21:10 

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My 6th grader has a few weak points. One of those is 'meeting the pass'.
He would find a good position and wave his hand to call for the ball. When his team mate passes the ball, he doesn't step or run forward to meet the pass.
many times, the ball got stolen because the defenders are lurking around.
I see two issues. first he doesn't meet the pass and secondly he doesn't pay attention to nearby defenders focusing just the ball.
this makes him look really bad on court.

He was told many times. but by the time he gets to court, he forgets. we need drills to correct that bad habit.

Is there any good drills (or video drills) to train him?


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PostPosted: 04 May 2015, 06:35 
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You can do any passing drill (partner pass, 4 corners, etc) and just have him meet the pass every time. That will start developing the habit.

Then add competition... 3on3, 4on4,5on5 no dribble half or full court. This is when you enforce this concept in competition situations.

Then eventually you reinforce in regular practice scrimmages and games.

It's a matter of developing a "habit". Once you add the pressure and intensity of games, players always revert to "habits" because there is not time to think out there. You can only recognize familiar situations and react to them and fall back on habits.

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PostPosted: 04 May 2015, 10:25 

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Thank you for tip Jeff. About 3on3, 4on4 and 5on5 pass, without dribble I think it's great drill. It involves passing/ catching. Additionally, it really test a player's ability to get open.
Unfortunately, I don't see any coach running that type of drill.

In general, passing and catching is not emphasized that much. 3man weave is the most often seen. But they are so relaxed without defender.

anyway, I actually have a follow up question related to catching.
when a player gets himself ready for catching, shouldn't he get into athletic stance? In this case, even you catch the ball without moving, you are ready to pivot, shoot, pass and dribble. basically you are in triple thread already. If you need to run to catch, all you need to do is to sprint. My son always wave his hand and then stand straight. so it will be two step for him. if he needs to meet the ball, he has to bend his legs and sprint.


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PostPosted: 04 May 2015, 13:28 
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Yea ideally you catch in a good athletic stance. But it's also situational. If you are cutting the basket and receive the ball near the lane you catch in stride and shoot a lay up. If there is heavy traffic and/or a 7 footer there you might catch with jump stop and immediately pass back out to the perimeter. And lastly if you are coming off a screen and going to catch in your shooting range you should be preparing to shoot before the ball gets to you.

With that said, I think what you suggest is right... in most cases you want to be in an good athletic stance as you catch the ball and if at all possible in a position to shoot immediately.

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PostPosted: 04 May 2015, 15:07 

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One drill for this we used is called 10 good passes. Teams of 3 (ideal number of players is 9). Drill is half court only and the offense has to make 10 good passes and they win. Offense can't dribble. It's basically cutthroat with a team waiting to come in from the sideline. It moves fast. If the offense turns it over, ball goes out of bounds, or they dribble, they're off the court. The defense becomes new offense and the sideline team is the new defense. Let the defense play aggressively. There's no way you can sit back and "wait for the pass" in this drill or you'll get killed.

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PostPosted: 15 Nov 2016, 10:46 

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I know this is an older thread, but I wanted to share my experience. Currently I coach a team that has had a lot of trouble meeting the pass. We started off the season and gave up probably 20+ turnovers off of bad passes in the first few games, it was killing us. I started using the 3v3,4v4,5v5, no dribble/complete 10 passes. This made a huge difference. It also helped us handle pressing teams. It's slow work, but I feel like this has made all the difference.


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PostPosted: 15 Nov 2016, 13:20 

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dlerch1 - good to hear and thanks for the feedback. I think making it a lot harder in practice than it will be in the game is a good place to start. Having additional pressure that's almost unreasonable at times helps the kids get creative on getting open and meeting the pass.

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